Trusted Tips and Resources

Trusted Tips & Resources

Trusted community steps up to help a local Saskatoon woman after her contractor nightmare Part 1

The Trusted teamwork for the public, we do that by finding great local businesses, verifying they are as good as we have heard, and contracting them to uphold the 5 Trusted Guarantees. These 5 Trusted guarantees are the cornerstone of our business and the businesses we partner with, and if something does go wrong we hold the businesses to their obligations....that's what the Trusted Saskatoon businesses sign up for. That's why we promote them and why we believe they are the best businesses in the cities we serve. 

 

 

JANICE'S BUILD- the Trusted Rebuild

Last week we heard about Janice, a single Mum in Saskatoon that has not been lucky enough to deal with a  ' Trustworthy' business, in fact, she has dealt with the kind of company that we set Trusted Saskatoon up to protect people from.... let's share the first part of the story. 

Janice is a lovely woman who has been left in a house that was a home 5 months ago & now is a dangerous unfinished, building site. She is trying to keep on a brave face for her 10-year-old daughter but is sick with worry that the house won't survive the Winter cold that is on its way,  and wondering every day how she is going to manage to get back on her feet .......why? All because of an unscrupulous Saskatoon contractor that has been her worst nightmare! 

 

We heard her story last week through a friend of Sara's, the Trusted founder, and we were extremely moved by her plight, and wanted to do what we could to help...it's a great thing we know an amazing group of local Saskatoon businesses, who are invested in their community and who truly set the standard for integrity in the Saskatoon Business community!

 

We sent out an email at 9 pm that night, we had some responses back within the hour and by the end of the week, we have already had so many wonderful Trusted Saskatoon directory partners offer Janice their help...and  Trusted Regina partners!  

 

 


Thank you also to Aaron Loraas- from Loraas disposal for donating bins and garbage fees for the project, Winroc and Rona for materials and Heating roofing systems in Colorado for the roof!! 

Sara went to surprise Janice tonight, who knew nothing of this until then..it was extremely emotional, Janice was completely gobsmacked when Sara knocked on her door and told her why she was there. Once the first round of tears dried, and she realized Sara was above board, she showed her around the house and Sara couldn't believe the state this contractor has left her in. We shared the news about the wonderful Trusted Saskatoon companies that had already stepped up to help her, and she was happy to allow us to document this journey by blog and video, so she could prevent other people from having the same thing happen to them....so this is Part 1 of THE HOUSE THAT TRUSTED SASKATOON REBUILT!   

So whats next?
 
 
Dave Andercheck from JABA Construction, a well-recognized business leader and expert in the construction industry is going to cast his professional eye over Janice's bomb site of a home, and he will then be able to assess just what needs to be done, and from there we can start planning the rebuild, and what we need in regards help & materials from these amazing Trusted Saskatoon companies.
 
 We will leave you with Sara's comments as the last words of Part 1
 
" Saskatoon has been amazing to me and my family, and I believe it's important to step up to help people in the community you live in. Janice's situation is not uncommon unfortunately, thing like this happen every day to families and individuals in this city and this province, that's why I was motivated to start Trusted. I am just glad I am in a position, along with the Trusted partners to help her with this hand up back on her feet again. 
 
To start the ball rolling I will donate $1000 in TrustedSaskatoon.com  Gift Certificates for Janice to put towards this rebuild. She can use them at any of the partner businesses on the www.trustedsaskatoon.com directory.  I am not going to publicly name the contractor or his business...that is not my place, but after what I saw & heard today I believe strongly that the company  should have their A rating on the Better Business Bureau of Saskatchewan lowered to an F, and the insurance companies should take them off their preferred list of contractors"  
 
  

Trusted Saskatoon directory Saskatoon Kitchen & Bathroom Design experts Show

Trusted Saskatoon.com THE Saskatoon Directory   is proud to be hosting a Talk to the Experts show " The Trusted Show' Monthly on Newstalk 650 ..the first show aired June 9th 2012.  Find them all here in our tips library or on our Trusted Channel on You Tube which is a fabulous resource of Tips, Interviews, Demos and Tours.

What this means is you can listen to all the shows ON DEMAND, you can share them with friends who may be interested in the shows subjects and this makes sure you never have to miss a Trusted Show - we think out of the Box when it comes to marketing, so we can provide the BEST Possible service for YOU the public- we are the Only Local Directory that works for you...and the only  place to offer this kind of service in Saskatoon!  

This latest show we are featuring is the Kitchen & Bathroom  Design Show

 

 

 Kevin from KTS Custom Cabinets- a Trusted Saskatoon Kitchen experts

 Tamara from Metric Design Centre - Your Trusted Saskatoon Interior Designers 

Joel from End Of The Roll - Trusted Saskatoon Flooring Experts

 

 

All the shows questions have been submitted by our wonderful Trusted Saskatoon Facebook Fans  and one lucky fans question was chosen by Brent Loucks to win the Prize package submitted by the 3 Trusted Businesses worth  OVER $700

 

Enjoy the show!! 


 

 

  

 

Trusted Saskatoon Kitchen and Renovations expert share a Tip on How to Design a Kitchen - PART 5

If you are dreaming of achieve your Saskatoon Kitchen and Home Renovation & improvement goals! You describe the dream, they bring it to reality! Save money ,time and stress - they will get the job done right! They have a passion and years of expertise to help your renovation dreams come true. Saskatoon Woodworks are your TRUSTED SASKATOON RENOVATION EXPERTS and Saskatoon Kitchen Experts  are waiting to help you with all your home renovation projects.

To check out all the Kitchen design tip blogs click here

Here they share a tip on How to Design a Kitchen - Kitchen Islands:

PART 5:

A kitchen island and its cousin, the peninsula, can vastly expand the design potential and convenience of just about any kitchen. Among the earliest islands were farm tables that gave cooks extra work surfaces and doubled as informal dining stations. Today, a homeowner has the option of islands made of the same materials as the base cabinets and countertop for an integral look. On the other hand, the latest trend is leaning back toward a freestanding look, with upper cabinets, base cabinets, and countertop materials in a mix of materials and colors.

In this scenario, any freestanding piece of furniture with at least one part standing at about counter height can function as an island. Most homeowners prefer a piece that offers hidden cabinets, open shelves, or a combination of the two in addition to another work surface. In a more high-tech kitchen, lower storage may also include a host of refinements such as wine racks and refrigerated drawers.

 

Kitchen islands can come in a variety of shapes and sizes to accommodate any kitchen.
Kitchen islands can come in a variety of shapes
and sizes to accommodate any kitchen.

 

In many kitchens, the island is used as an extra workstation, adding to the usefulness of the work triangle or corridor kitchen. In others, it's used as a low, casual divider defining the perimeter of the kitchen where it meets the family room or breakfast room. In either case, if you add in-floor wiring, plumbing, and gas lines, the possibilities for an island's usefulness are endless. Just about any appliance can be located in an island if the plumbing and electrical wiring are planned in. A wine rack, a gourmet wine chiller, an under-cabinet refrigerator, and an ice-maker on the family room side are very nice options.

On the kitchen side, add a second dishwasher, a microwave, or even an under-cabinet wall oven. In a small or medium-size kitchen, one of the most popular uses of an island is as a place to house the sink. The option of facing toward the family room is so attractive that a kitchen island sink has replaced the classic under-the-window sink in many homes. In a larger kitchen, the island may house a second sink. When combined with easy access to the microwave and the fridge, this setup creates a secondary work triangle.

Your needs and tastes will help determine what kind of island you should have. In a smaller space, you'll get maximum storage, convenience, and a neat appearance if you specify cabinets on both sides of the kitchen island so that dishes can be stashed or removed from either side. For a stylish, freestanding-furniture look that's especially at home in traditional settings, specify an island with table legs and a low shelf for open display and storage. The common kitchen principle of extending every countertop at least an inch beyond the cabinets to prevent dribbling spills down cabinet fronts especially applies to islands. Obviously, you'll need significantly more overhang for knee room (at least 15 inches) if your island is used as a snack table or as a higher snack counter with stools (18 inches).

One of the most dramatic, popular island designs is two-tiered, with food prep on the kitchen side and counter seating on the other. A sink can be stationed either on the same level as the eating counter or on a waist-high work counter with the dining surface on a higher plane. When the appliance you want to house in the island is a cooktop, however, safety dictates that the cooktop be on a lower plane, with the snack counter at least four to six inches higher. Specify heat-resistant material for the countertops adjoining the cooktop and at least 24 inches of counter for landing space on both sides, and provide for at least four inches of heat-resistant backsplash.

An island opposite the fridge is a logical place for the microwave. It's still within the work triangle, which makes sense because most of what goes in the microwave comes from the fridge. Alternatively, if your microwave gets more use by the kids as a snack-fixer, you may prefer to locate it outside the triangle but still near the fridge, in a combination work island/snack bar. Wall ovens are often located outside the work triangle since they're not used as much as a cooktop, and anything you bake or roast will stay in the oven for at least 15 minutes. An island may prove the most convenient landing spot for hot foods out of the oven.

In generously sized kitchens, it might be best to think along the lines of "if one island is good, two are better." A primary island may be stationed within the work triangle, housing extra storage, a mini-fridge or refrigerator drawers, a prep sink, a drop-in cooktop, and so on. Another island might serve solely as a snack bar, perhaps with a small TV perched at one end on a swivel base. If this island defines the perimeter of the kitchen, choose your island base, top, and counter stools to coordinate with the decorative scheme of the adjoining room. Whether this means elegant leather bar chairs, pretty wicker with plump cushions, or metal bistro stools with amusing cut-out motifs is up to you. Even in the kitchen, an island is for fun and adventure!

Kitchen Desks

There's been a real revolution in the definition of "homework" in the past decade, and today's kitchens have risen to the occasion beautifully. Millions of Americans telecommute from conventional jobs or work independently from home on a part-time or full-time basis. Although a dedicated home office is very popular, another option is to locate the office, or a least a workstation, within the kitchen, so that work can be performed in a common area.

Even if the home office is used simply for planning meals and ordering groceries online today, you never know what it might be used for in the future! It would probably be smart to install as sophisticated an electrical system as you can, since your family's needs will likely increase. After all, the kitchen has always been "command central" for the typical family. And, for the many children who have always preferred to do their homework at the kitchen table no matter how well outfitted their rooms, a computer in the kitchen makes it even easier.

A computer desk in the kitchen can take many forms, but don't just set the electronics onto a base cabinet counter and be done with it. If you spend any time at all at this workstation, you'll need an ergonomically sound chair, plenty of knee space, a keyboard tray that drops down to the correct height, and so on. You may want the workstation to face into the kitchen or into the family room so you can keep an eye on your crew; or you may prefer it tucked into a corner, facing the wall, for a greater sense of privacy. As long as you avoid the busy work triangle area, wherever you can fit in your computer station may work.

Power is what the computerized home is about, so make sure you have enough. You'll probably be adding electrical outlets every 36 inches or so along your backsplashes (or on power strips beneath the upper cabinets if switchplates will disturb your backsplash design), so while the electricity is being planned, plan for the desktop computer area. In addition to a computer and a phone, you may need electrical and phone outlets plus counterspace and lower-storage space for a printer, answering machine, fax machine, and any other "must-have" equipment. To conserve space, look for units that provide more than one of these functions. If this is where you'll stash the small TV, make plans for that, too. All this may mean extra new wiring, but most older homes need it to make the leap into the new electronic era.

What if you prefer the scenic byway to the electronic highway? Chances are, you'll still be more comfortable with some kind of a workstation, however informal, in the kitchen. Whether you choose a small writing table, a conventional desk to coordinate with the style of your kitchen, or a desk made of the same material as your kitchen is up to you. In a traditional, formal kitchen, you might enjoy an l8th-century "secretaire" that includes upper glassed cabinets and open shelves as well as lower drawers and a drop-down writing surface. In other cases, you'll want to plan upper storage cabinets with either glass or solid doors.

You'll need enough counterspace to hold a few desk necessities (pens, notepads, scissors, and so on); a few shallow, wide drawers to stash bills and clutter; and space for your recipe box and the cookbooks you use most. If the desk or counter is tucked into a corner near an adjacent wall or run of tall wood cabinets, you can hang a bulletin board and a good-size calendar.

The kitchen is not only a room that you use every single day, it also takes much more abuse that most of the other rooms in your house. As a result, every kitchen needs a little work eventually -- whether it's a simple face-lift or a complete overhaul. Hopefully now you know how to make the kitchen that is right for you.


 

Trusted Saskatoon Renovations expert share a Tip on How to Design a Kitchen - PART 4

 TRUSTED SASKATOON RENOVATION EXPERTS  are waiting to help you with all your home renovation projects.

Here they share a tip on How to Design a Kitchen - Eat-in Kitchens:

PART 4:

The formal, separate dining room has passed in and out of vogue over the decades, but the option of eating in the kitchen has always held appeal. The informal, efficient design of an eat-in kitchen is ideal for today's casual, fast-paced lifestyle. At the same time, today's tastes are distinctly more luxurious than they were a couple of decades ago.

Fortunately, unless you yearn for an authentic period home, there's no reason why you can't have a kitchen dining setup that's both easygoing and opulent. Depending on the size of your kitchen, you have a number of choices for creating an eat-in kitchen. Today's savvy design solutions and coordinated products ensure that any option you choose will fit right in and look great.

  • Counter Dining. Where space is slim or where the users have no special needs, a breakfast bar looks great. A breakfast bar's informality and slim silhouette lends itself naturally to a casual, contemporary scheme, but if your kitchen is opulently traditional, using the same materials for the counter and bar will tie it in perfectly. Imaginative counter stools can be great decorating assets. Make sure the counter overhang is deep enough to accommodate knees comfortably, and, if your stools don't have footrests, make sure your bar has a footrest ledge or rail.

    A two-tiered peninsula or island can house a sink or cooktop on the lower, kitchen side with room for two to four diners opposite. If the peninsula or island houses only a small sink, there's usually plenty of room to seat a number of diners on the same level as the work surface. (A cooktop requires more space and, if possible, the barrier of a different level for safety's sake.) Ideally, allow at least 42 inches from the open end to the opposite wall, and don't locate the fridge or wall oven opposite, where an open door would block traffic. Allow at least 18 inches and preferably 24 inches of elbow room for each diner. And if breakfast never will be your thing, rest assured your cozy nook or chic bar will work just fine for after-school and midnight snacks.

  • Breakfast Nooks. If you have a bit more available space or want a more traditional, cozy look, you might consider adding a breakfast area with built-in banquette seating. A bay window alcove, with a banquette serving as a window seat and with pull-up chairs on the other side of the table, is charming if you can manage it. You can create a welcoming air with plump bench or stool cushions that carry your color scheme.

    No matter how small your kitchen or how rushed your schedule, there is almost always a way to work a little breakfast into the equation. The breakfast nook with fitted bench or banquette seating is a cozy solution that works well in ethnic or country/cottage kitchen design schemes. It's also a cute solution in retro settings inspired by a '50s malt shop booth. The table may be freestanding or may be a peninsula, with one end anchored to the wall or to a run of cabinets. The coziest breakfast nook setup features benches that are parallel, with the table between.

    For a more relaxed, open layout, the benches may be placed perpendicular to one another, with the table spanning the open side. A breakfast nook can be a comfortable solution where space is scant, because benches require much less floor space than chairs. If your family includes a mix of young and not-so-young, a breakfast nook may be a perfect -- and practical -- alternative. Benches are safer than counter stools for young children, and, because the table is a conventional height, it is accessible to wheelchair users.

     

    Eat in kitchens can be the height of comfort and convenience.
    Eat in kitchens can be the height of comfort and convenience.

     

  • Eat-in Kitchens. For large kitchens, or those that feature a natural alcove, dining tables that seat anywhere from four to 12 people are a good option. You can have fun picking out chairs that complement your own personal taste, from heirloom traditional to classic modern glass-and-metal. Another option you may consider is having an island or table made of the same material as your cabinets or countertops. In keeping with the informal nature of kitchen dining, consider small armchairs all around, not just at the head and foot of the table.

    A round table is a friendly choice and is safer for an active family or in a smaller space. In the dining area of your kitchen, away from the stove, you can define a welcoming space with more elaborate curtains or draperies than you would use at a window in the work area. For continuity's sake, match or coordinate your eating-area window treatments with those in the work area. Coordinate window treatments and tabletop textile colors with seating cushions for an inviting, total look.
In our final section, we look at the very useful and convenient kitchen island.

 

Find Trusted Saskatoon Renovation & Design Experts!

Trusted Saskatoon Renovations expert share a Tip on How to Design a Kitchen - PART 3

 TRUSTED SASKATOON RENOVATION EXPERTS and are waiting to help you with all your home renovation projects.

 

Here they share a tip on How to Design a Kitchen - Kitchen Shape Considerations:

PART 3:

In kitchen geometry, the work triangle is the shape that connects the sink, cooktop, and refrigerator. The work triangle is the functional center of every kitchen.

Studies have shown that in the most efficient kitchens, the three legs of the work triangle add up to at least 12 feet but no more than 23 feet. Of course, your kitchen's basic shape and size will influence the type of work triangle that fits best. Regardless of the perimeter shape of the room, most kitchens are organized around one of several basic kitchen layouts, each with its own type of triangle. One's right for you!

 

Peninsula dining on an angle leaves the kitchen triangle clear.
  Peninsula dining on an angle leaves the kitchen triangle clear.

 

  • U-Shape: This shape puts the stove, fridge, and sink each on a different wall and offers a very compact triangle that lets you prepare a meal while walking the shortest distance. It works best with the sink (the most-used element) in the center of the "U" and the fridge at one end of a run of counters to avoid breaking up a work surface. This shape works well in a kitchen that's nearly square or in a kitchen where you want to tightly define one end of a larger space as the basic work area, with an island set in the open end of the "U," perhaps fronting onto the family room or breakfast room.

  • L-Shape: This shape uses two walls of the kitchen for the three points of the work triangle. Often, the fridge is at one end of the long leg of the "L," the sink is toward the center of the same wall, and the stove is perpendicular, on the short leg of the "L." In contrast to the U-shape kitchen, the "L" has a long, rather than a short, wall facing into the rest of the room. Room traffic does not cross into the triangle, and, since this design uses only two walls, the triangle is long and relatively narrow, allowing for a more open layout. This setup is well-suited to a large room where the kitchen shares space with a family room. Additional counterspace may further lengthen one leg of the "L."

  • G-Shape: This shape features one appliance on each of two walls and the third appliance on a peninsula that separates the work area from an adjoining breakfast area or family room. If housing the cooktop in the accessible peninsula worries you (for safety reasons), you can always put the sink there instead and locate the cooktop on a full wall within the kitchen itself. Alternatively, put the cooktop on the peninsula, but create a safety margin by making the peninsula a tiered affair, with the cooktop at least six inches lower than the serving ledge.
Whatever your plan, the sink should take central position if at all possible, as it's used more often than either the refrigerator or the stove. If you locate the sink on the same wall as the stove, with the main work area in the middle, you won't drip water on the floor when you go from the sink to the cooktop. When placing the refrigerator, make sure the single-door model, when open, faces into the work triangle, not out of it.

Be sure you've allotted ample counterspace right next to any appliance: You'll want to set down heavy grocery bags near the fridge and slippery wet crystal next to the sink. It's especially important to have enough space (an absolute minimum width of 18 inches, and preferably 24 to 36 inches) right next to the cooktop, range, and oven, and on at least the opening side of the microwave and fridge. If you're using laminate countertops elsewhere in the kitchen, use heat-resistant mate-rial, such as ceramic tile, to create "landing space" near cooking appliances.

Great Little Galleys

Kitchens that work in small or narrow spaces deserve mention because they're able to fit the same essentials -- stove, sink, fridge, work surfaces, and cabinets--into what are often pretty snug situations. Named for the food preparation areas of ships, galley kitchens come in a couple of styles.

  • Corridor. This shape puts two points of the triangle on one wall and the third point on the opposite wall (most often the sink and the stove are placed on the same wall, with the fridge opposite). The length of the room will determine how much space there will be for cabinets and work surfaces.

    Corridor kitchens are often used where there is no other pathway to the next room and the traffic flows right through the work triangle. While this configuration is a step-saving solution, for safety as well as efficiency this setup should be avoided if at all possible, as should any design that allows household traffic to break into the triangle.

  • One-Wall. This shape lines up the fridge, sink, and stove on one wall. It foregoes the step-saving convenience the triangle affords, as the user needs to walk farther from one end of the kitchen to the other, especially if there is to be adequate countertop space. A popular solution is to station one or more islands opposite the wall of appliances. If wiring can be added in the floor, the island can be stationed near the refrigerator and can hold the microwave and other small appliances.

    A tiered island allows for some simple types of food prep on the lower, kitchen side and a snack counter on the higher side, facing into the adjoining room. A one-wall kitchen is a practical choice for tiny spaces. It also can be tucked conveniently behind closed doors in a wall alcove, so it's great for second kitchens in recreation rooms, studios, or even master suites.

 

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