Trusted Tips and Resources

Trusted Tips & Resources

Trusted Saskatoon Jewellers at Batemans Share The History Of Platinum

Bateman Jewellers are Trusted Saskatoon jewellery experts! Did you know that they are the oldest independent jewellery store in Saskatoon?  Bateman Jewellers maintain that the relationship with their clients is very important to them. In their latest Saskatoon jewellery tip they share the interesting history of the metal platinum. 

THE HISTORY OF PLATINUM 

Today, we take for granted that platinum is a coveted precious metal but do you know how long it has been around? 

The answer may surprise you - It was declared a precious metal in just 1751 

By comparison, Ancient Egyptians began using gold and silver to decorate sacred objects since around 3,000 BC. 
From 2551 BC to 2490 BC, they capped the Pyramids of Giza with solid gold, the ultimate sign of the metal’s importance and value. So if like us here at Batemans you are curious about platinum metal history read on! 

Incognito Platinum Metal

Platinum’s  history slipped into human use as a by-product of gold and silver mining. 

Gold was found with platinum and the two blended as they were hammered into shape. 

Platinum was thought to be silver — even though it was much harder. 

Chemists have identified platinum mixed with gold in items dating back to Egypt’s Middle Kingdom (1991-1718 BC). One example is the gold and “silver” cover on the 700 BCE Egyptian Casket of Thebes. An early examiner noted that while some of the silver was heavily oxidized, curiously enough, other “silver” was unaffected. In 1901, French chemist, Marcellin Berthelot, tested the metal and learned that the untarnished silver metal was a combination of platinum, iridium, and gold. 


White Specks and “Little Silver”

Across the Atlantic, archaeologists discovered Pre-Columbian sacred and decorative pieces made of gold with distinctive white specks. These were identified as platinum. In 16th century South America, Spanish conquistadors searched rivers and streams for gold and silver the Spanish King so desperately needed. In the process, they found chunks of platinum. Alas, they called it “platina,” meaning “little silver” and discarded it with no idea it was rare and valuable.

A Hard Fact

To call platinum “little silver” is insulting enough and that isn’t the worst of platinum metal history. In 1735, Antonio de Ulloa, a Spanish scientist, naval general, and explorer, visited Ecuador on a scientific mission. He encountered “platina” in gold mines where it was considered a gold “impurity.” Some thought it was “unripe gold,” and put it back in the mine or ground to “ripen” believing it would yellow with age. Intrigued, de Ulloa undertook to study it. He identified platinum as a separate metal that occurred with gold in alluvial deposits. Indeed, Ulloa found it extremely hard and invulnerable to heat which made it almost impossible to separate from gold nuggets. He observed that platinum was a “nuisance” or “hindrance” that interfered with gold mining. The Spanish abandoned some gold mines with high concentrations of this “nuisance.”

Precious Platinum Metal

In 1751, Swedish scientist, Henrik Scheffer, published the results of his platinum studies. He called it “white gold” and stated that it was:
  • Hard but malleable with the hardness of malleable iron.
  • A precious metal with durability and corrosion resistance similar to gold.
  • Unlike any of the six “old metals” because it is entirely precious containing no copper, tin, lead, iron, or mercury. Scheffer declared it a “seventh metal.”
  • Fusible with arsenic.

Workable? Well . . .

In 1786, Francois Chabaneau, a French chemist working for Charles III of Spain, developed a technique for creating somewhat workable platinum but the results were highly inconsistent. At one point, a story says he grew so frustrated with platinum that he trashed the lab given him by the King. That same year, Antoine Lavoisier, “the father of modern chemistry,” succeeded in melting tiny quantities of platinum, but not enough to work with.

Who Is Marc Etienne Janety?

Monsieur Janety was Louis XVI’s, Royal Goldsmith. He created a platinum and glass sugar bowl for the king whose beauty caused Louis XVI to famously declare that platinum was:

 “ The only metal fit for Kings.” 

In 1794, a year after the revolutionary government executed Louis XVI, Janety prudently left Paris. In 1796, he returned to create the revolutionary government’s official kilogram and meter measures out of platinum because it was the most durable and corrosion-resistant metal.




Pure Platinum

Above, we mentioned Chabaneau’s efforts to create workable platinum. The results proved inconsistent because he didn’t realize that platinum ore contained other platinum group metals — osmium, iridium, rhodium, and palladium. In the early 1800s, an English chemist, William Wollaston, found a way to produce pure platinum on a commercial scale. He kept his technique secret until just before his death.

The Heat Is On

In the waning years of the 19th century, new high-temperature blowtorches made it possible to work platinum into fine jewelry. Cartier in Paris and Tiffany & Co in New York took the lead, making platinum jewelry a status symbol. Many famous stones are set in platinum — including the Hope Diamond — are set in platinum. Nothing less will do for beauty, strength, purity, and natural white colour.

Platinum Metal Strength

Today it holds its status as the elite precious metal chosen by celebrities. It has also become the symbol of the exclusive credit cards, programs, and so on. Yet thanks to advances in technology and techniques — not to mention that its price per ounce is significantly lower than gold — platinum is available to many more customers and very popular in bridal rings. Can anything match the platinum solitaire?

Platinum: The Hypoallergenic Metal

Over the decades, we’ve learned much more about platinum. One discovery stands out: it’s hypoallergenic. This makes it a prime consideration for customers with sensitivities to nickel and copper.





sited by May 31, 2019, By Elizabeth Raffel 

Trusted Saskatoon Jewellers at Batemans share a Tip about Hand Sanitizer Effect On Jewellery

Bateman Jewellers are Trusted Saskatoon jewellery experts! Did you know that they are the oldest independent jewellery store in Saskatoon?  Bateman Jewellers maintain that the relationship with their clients is very important to them, and Trusted Saskatoon is sure you have heard Cam say in his well-known radio ads 

'Your jewellery is a lifetime investment; Buy it from a lifetime friend. ' 

What Does Hand Sanitizer Do to Our Jewellery?


In the past few weeks, you've probably increased your use of hand sanitizer and other soaps due to the global spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19 for short). But while all of those disinfecting agents are protecting you, they might be hurting something else—your jewellery.


In Batemans latest jewellery tip they share an article from JCK Online - a North American Jewellery Industry website. 




On the best days, many of us are germaphobes. My obsession with keeping germs at bay went into overdrive when I became a mom, and then throw in a pandemic, and I’m considering fashioning myself a hand sanitizer holster. Oh yeah, I’d wear it.
Years ago when I worked in retail, even then I had a small bottle of hand sanitizer close at hand. I remember being told that too much could eat away at the rhodium plating on my ring (I had a white gold wedding set at that time). Still, a quick rub here and there kept my hands feeling clean, and, though my ring definitely bled yellow over time, it’s hard to know if that was the reason why—or if it was just general wear and tear.


Currently, constant hand-washing and sanitizing isn’t just for peace of mind; it’s highly recommended. I don’t even want to write the word COVID-19—I swear it echoes in my dreams. But it’s keeping us prudently cleaning our hands, and in turn, cleaning our jewelry, too—at least, the pieces we wear on our fingers.
Let me please preface this by saying that yes, you should absolutely positively wash wash wash, spray spray spray, scrub scrub scrub—whatever keeps your hands clean. Jewelry is precious, that is true, but your health is all the more so.
However, given that I’m sporting a newly redesigned wedding ring, I can’t help but wonder what I might be doing to it with my constant use of chemicals. Am I causing damage?

I always take my ring off to shower, lotion, make meatballs—you get it. Not trying to gunk up the jewels here! But I almost never take it off to wash my hands, and certainly not to sanitize. I’m betting most wearers are the same.
I spoke with Shan Aithal, a metallurgist at Stuller, to get the dirt (pardon the pun) on keeping hands—and rings—clean. 

“To my knowledge, hand sanitizers are not capable of removing tough, albeit thin, rhodium that’s on a piece of jewelry,” says Aithal. “Hand sanitizers come in two varieties: alcohol-based and non–alcohol-based. The ones with alcohol are benign to jewelry items as alcohol is the main germ-killing ingredient. However, non–alcohol-based ones typically use chlorine-based compounds as germicides. These chlorine compounds could react with water and release free chlorine. Free chlorine radical is very reactive and could cause tarnishing of jewelry, especially if it is made of sterling silver. Also, halogens are known to cause stress corrosion cracking in low karat golds, in particular, nickel white golds.”

It is worth noting, in this case, that the CDC recommends using alcohol-based hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol content. As long as you’re doing that, your metal will probably stay in great shape.
Soaps, according to Aithal, are a different story. “Soaps can contain abrasives, like Lava or that orange goo dispensed near hand-washing stations, that could damage the surface of jewelry and cause rhodium to be worn away.”

What about diamonds and sapphires? 


It won’t damage them but can leave a filmy residue on the stones over time, dulling the sparkle. But it’s not permanent, and nothing a quick soak in an ultrasonic can’t fix.


“If anything, people should be cleaning their jewelry more,” says Susi Smither, founder of The Rock Hound. “Think of all that horrid buildup of crud under rings and behind the setting of claw-set earrings. Hand sanitizer kills the baddies then evaporates fast—this shouldn’t have any detrimental effects on your gemstones, even materials such as gemstones and pearls. If you’re worried, at the end of the day give them a rinse and dry when you get home.”


Peggy Grosz, senior vice president at Assael, suggests erring more on the side of caution when it comes to pearls. 

“Sanitized skin should not come into contact with your pearls until completely dry and evaporate—wait about five minutes before putting on your pearls,” says Grosz. “As with perfumes and hairspray, the alcohol in the hand sanitizer can change the surface of the pearl, the two noticeable differences being a loss of lustre and a change in colour—white pearls, for example, will become yellowed if repeatedly exposed to such chemicals. Pearl rings should be removed when applying hand sanitizer, but because they have a mounting which separates them from direct contact with the chemicals, it is safe to put rings back on after a few minutes.”

Bottom line? Most, if not all, jewellery will be just fine, lovers of Georgian and early Victorian pieces should  take special care as water can get into rings with closed-back mountings and affect the appearance of the stones. Also, locket rings or any ring that has a photo of some other decoration under glass should not be washed with water.

But of course, sometimes the simplest advice is the best. When in doubt, it is always better to take your rings off before washing your hands.!


 If you are resting your rings on the sink while you scrub, please be sure the drain is closed, okay


Bateman Jewellers is a Trusted Saskatoon Jewellery Store 




sighted from  by 

Trusted Saskatoon Jewellers Bateman Jewellers shares a video on the Lampe Berger Diffuser

Bateman Jewellers are Saskatoon Jewellery Experts...did you know that they are the oldest independent jewellery store in Saskatoon! Bateman Jewellers maintain that the relationship with their clients is very important to them, and Trusted is sure you have heard Cam say in his well known radio ads " Your jewellery is a lifetime investment; Buy it from a lifetime friend. " ..Trusted can attest to the fact that they really DO mean it, and we are proud to have them on board as our Trusted Saskatoon Jeweller! Here Cam shares

Bateman Jewellers your Trusted Saskatoon Jeweller

Here Cam shares a video on the Lampe Berger Diffuser:

While Mother Nature may be slow to bring on the crisp freshness of spring breezes, why not take matters into your own hands with a diffuser from Lampe Berger? With fragrances like Grapefruit Passion, Orange Blossom and Fresh Linen, you'll be stomping out the stale smells of winter with a bouquet of delightful scents.

 

Find Bateman Jewellers on 2nd Ave South or online at http://www.batemanjewellers.com they are your Trusted SASKATOON JEWELLERS

Read all of Batemans Saskatoon Jewellry tips here

Trusted Saskatoon Jewellers Bateman Jewellers shares a tip on Clearing the Air with Lampe Berger

Bateman Jewellers are Saskatoon Jewellery Experts...did you know that they are the oldest independent jewellery store in Saskatoon! Bateman Jewellers maintain that the relationship with their clients is very important to them, and Trusted is sure you have heard Cam say in his well known radio ads " Your jewellery is a lifetime investment; Buy it from a lifetime friend. " ..Trusted can attest to the fact that they really DO mean it, and we are proud to have them on board as our Trusted Saskatoon Jeweller! Here Cam shares

Bateman Jewellers your Trusted Saskatoon Jeweller

Here Cam shares a tip on Clearing the Air with Lampe Berger:

If you've checked out our in-store Lampe Berger display but have never been sure if this type of purifying system will work in your home (especially if you have have tweens or younger children) then here is a perspective from a Ottawa-based lifestyle blogger. You might find her take on this product "refreshing"!

After two weeks taking turns curling up on the couch to hog the blankets and the tissues, yesterday we were all finally well enough to have people over. And by “people” I mean “the kids’ friends” because when are we ever entertaining? (Rarely. Who has the energy?) In the wintertime, I like to light my favourite pine-scented candle or throw a batch of cookies in the oven to make the house smell warm and welcoming and mask the ever-present scent of fried egg whites (I eat a lot of egg whites), but yesterday I tried something a little different: a beautiful air purifying lamp, Lampe Berger. Lampe Berger sent me one to facilitate this review and has generously offered a starter kit to one lucky try small things reader so you can try it too.

What makes Lampe Berger different than your run-of-the-mill air freshener is its patented burner, originally developed over 100 years ago in France (ooh la la!) to help disinfect hospitals. The burner purifies and perfumes the air, destroying the molecules that make undesirable smells and diffusing one of over 50 scents of your choosing, including a fragrance-free So Neutral blend to use on its own or dilute another scent.

 

There are over 100 different lamps to choose from, ranging from classic designs like my Ovalie lamp, to more trendy and/or ornate models. I read the instructions a few times because I’m bit bumbling and nervous around flames (I almost lost my eyebrows the one time I tried to light the barbeque) but really, it’s very straightforward:

  • Remove the protective top, stopper, burner and wick
  • Insert the funnel and fill the lamp 2/3 full (I used the Fresh Linen scent)
  • Remove the funnel, insert the wick and burner and put the stopper on
  • Wait for 20 minutes
  • Remove the stopper and light the burner
  • Wait two minutes
  • Blow out the flame and put on the protective top
  • When the air is perfumed as you like, remove the protective top and put the stopper on the burner

 

My seven-year-old has lots of practice blowing out candles on birthday cakes so we let her blow out the flame. But it was hands-off after that.

 

Our main floor is all of 500 square feet, so in 20 minutes or so the entire downstairs smelled fresh and clean. A few hours later we made fish sticks for dinner and the house smelled like a wharf, but I lit the lamp again and within minutes Captain Highliner was a guest no longer. It’s like magic!

I’d love you to try it and see for yourself. To win a set just like mine (that’s a lamp, a burner, a 180 ml Home fragrance and a 180 ml So Neutral fragrance –a $48 value!), enter your contact information here then come back and tell me which Lampe Berger lamp and/or scent you’d like to try. You must leave a comment to be eligible. The giveaway is open to Canadians (excluding Quebec) and ends March 8, 2015.

You can learn more about Lampe Berger on their website, Facebook page, Instagram account and on Twitter and follow them everywhere at #LampeBerger. Lampe Berger products are widely available across Canada. In Ottawa you’ll find them at C.A. Paradis, Suite Dreams Home Emporium, Hallmark Davis (Carling) and The Cookoo’s Nest.

Best of luck! 

 

Find Bateman Jewellers on 2nd Ave South or online at http://www.batemanjewellers.com they are your Trusted SASKATOON JEWELLERS

Read all of Batemans Saskatoon Jewellry tips here

 

 

 

 

Trusted Saskatoon Jewellers Bateman Jewellers tip on Victorinox line of Swiss Army watches

Bateman Jewellers are Saskatoon Jewellery Experts...did you know that they are the oldest independent jewellery store in Saskatoon! Bateman Jewellers maintain that the relationship with their clients is very important to them, and Trusted is sure you have heard Cam say in his well known radio ads " Your jewellery is a lifetime investment; Buy it from a lifetime friend. " ..Trusted can attest to the fact that they really DO mean it, and we are proud to have them on board as our Trusted Saskatoon Jeweller!

Here Cam shares a tip on Victorinox line of Swiss Army watches:

Get ready...our store will soon be the only store in Saskatoon to carry the Victorinox line of Swiss Army watches! And if you have any doubts as to how durable these watches are then check this video out!

 

 

Find Bateman Jewellers on 2nd Ave South or online at http://www.batemanjewellers.com they are your Trusted SASKATOON JEWELLERS
 

 

 Read all of Batemans Saskatoon Jewellry tips here

 

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