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Trusted Tips & Resources

Trusted Saskatoon Funeral Home Provides Information On Burial Services

Since 1910, Saskatoon Funeral Home has responded to the needs of Saskatoon & area citizens of every faith and every walk of life. They have a proud history as Saskatoon's longest-serving, local, family-owned and operated, full-service funeral and cremation provider to trace its roots to the beginning days of our city. Saskatoon Funeral Home are a Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 


Burial Services

Traditionally, a burial service involves a visitation, followed by a funeral service in a church, funeral home, or another place of worship. The casket is typically present at both these events, and it is your decision on whether to have the casket open or not. After the funeral service, the deceased is interred (earth burial) in a cemetery. Family or religious traditions are often a factor in choosing burial. Decisions need to be made on whether the deceased will be embalmed, what kind of casket to use, what cemetery to use and what to put on the gravestone.

Cemetery Types

Monumental cemetery: A monumental cemetery is the traditional style of cemetery where headstones or other monuments made of marble or granite rise vertically above the ground. There are countless different types of designs for headstones, ranging from very simple to large and complex.

Lawn cemetery: A lawn cemetery is where each grave is marked with a small commemorative plaque that is placed horizontally at the head of the grave at ground level. Families can still be involved in the design and the information contained on the plaque.

Columbarium: Columbarium walls are generally reserved for cremated remains. While cremated remains can be kept at home by families or scattered somewhere significant to the deceased, a columbarium provides friends and family with a place to come to mourn and visit.

Burial FAQ

What is opening and closing and what is involved?
Opening and closing fees can include up to and beyond 50 separate services provided by the cemetery.  Typically, the opening and closing fee include administration and permanent record keeping (determining ownership, obtaining permission and the completion of other documentation which may be required, entering the interment particulars in the interment register, maintaining all legal files); opening and closing the grave (locating the grave and laying out the boundaries, excavating and filling the interment space); installation and removal of the lowering device; placement and removal of artificial grass dressing and coco-matting at the grave site, levelling, tamping, re-grading and in some cases sodding the gravesite and levelling and re-sodding the grave if the earth settles.

Can we dig our own grave to avoid the charge for opening and closing?
The actual opening and closing of the grave is just one component of the opening and closing fee. Due to safety issues which arise around the use of machinery on cemetery property and the protection of other gravesites, the actual opening and closing of the grave are conducted by cemetery grounds personnel only. Some rural cemeteries do allow families to dig and fill the grave on their own.

Why is having a place to visit so important?
To remember and to be remembered are natural human needs. A permanent memorial in a cemetery provides a focal point for remembrance and memorializing of the deceased. Throughout human history, the memorialization of the dead has been a key component of almost every culture. Psychologists say that remembrance practices, from the funeral or memorial service to permanent memorialization, serve an important emotional function for survivors by helping them bring closure and allowing the healing process to begin. Providing a permanent resting place for the deceased is a dignified treatment for a loved one’s mortal remains, which fulfils the natural human desire for memorialization.

What happens when a cemetery runs out of land?
When a cemetery runs out of land, it will continue to operate and serve the community. The rate of cemetery usage has slowed due to cremation. Some families choose not to inter at a cemetery or they may be interred in an existing grave above a traditional burial. The projection of cemetery land running out has changed and the cemeteries in our area have adequate room for years to come.

In a hundred years will this cemetery still be there?
We think of cemetery lands as being in perpetuity. There are cemeteries throughout the world that have been in existence for hundreds of years.

How soon after or how long after a death must an individual be buried?
There is no law that states a specific time from burial. Considerations that will affect the timeline include the need to secure all permits and authorizations, notification of family and friends, preparation of the cemetery site, and religious considerations. 

Does a body have to be embalmed before it is buried?
No. Embalming is a choice which depends on a number of factors: if there is to be an open casket viewing of the body or if there is to be an extended time between death and internment. Public health laws may require embalming if the body is going to be transported by air or rail depending on the destination.

What options are available besides ground burial?
Besides ground burial, some cemeteries offer entombment in mausoleums. In addition, most cemeteries provide choices for those who have selected cremation. These often include placement of cremated remains in a niche of a columbarium or interment in an urn space.

What are burial vaults and grave liners?
These are the outside containers into which the casket is placed. Burial vaults are designed to protect the casket and may be made of a variety or combination of materials including concrete, stainless steel, galvanized steel, copper, bronze, plastic or fibreglass. A grave liner is a lightweight version of a vault which simply keeps the grave surface from sinking in.

Must I purchase a burial vault?
Most large, active cemeteries have regulations that require the use of a basic grave liner for maintenance and safety purposes. Either a grave liner or a burial vault will satisfy these requirements. Some smaller rural or churchyard cemeteries do not require the use of a container to surround the casket in the grave.


Visit their website to learn more about pre-planning a funeral and grief support, as well as the traditional funeral and cremation services that they have to offer. They are always there to help. Check out their listing on Trusted Saskatoon to read more reviews and to see all the services they offer. 

Saskatoon Funeral Home is your Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 


Trusted Saskatoon Funeral Home Share Information on Funeral Etiquette

Since 1910, Saskatoon Funeral Home has responded to the needs of Saskatoon & area citizens of every faith and every walk of life. They have a proud history as Saskatoon's longest-serving, local, family-owned and operated, full-service funeral and cremation provider to trace its roots to the beginning days of our city. Saskatoon Funeral Home are a Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 


Funeral Etiquette

Like everything in society, funeral etiquette and what is expected of you have evolved over time. As always common sense and good discretion are the best guides to proper funeral etiquette. Here are a few do’s and don'ts of funeral etiquette.

DO:

  • Express your condolences – It’s not easy to come up with words to offer sympathy to someone who has just lost a loved one. You don’t need to be a poet, simply saying something like “I am sorry for your loss, my thoughts and prayers are with you and your family” is enough. If you can’t be at a funeral service in person, sending a card or leaving a message on a memorial website is a perfect way to express your sympathy.
  • Dress appropriately – Gone are the days of dressing up in all black for a funeral, but jeans and a t-shirt aren’t exactly acceptable either. You should still dress to impress and avoid any bright or flashy colours. Wearing what you would wear for a wedding or a job interview would be the most appropriate. 
  • Sign the register book – The family will keep the register book as a memento for years. Be sure to include your full name and relationship to the deceased.
  • Give a gift – You don’t need to go overboard with your gift, after all, it is the thought that counts.  Suitable gifts include: flowers, a donation to the charity of the family’s choice, or you can make a commitment of service to the family at a later date. A commitment of service can be something as simple as cooking them dinner or offering to clean up their house, any of the “little” things that may be neglected while a family deals with death. Make sure you provide a signed card so the family knows who gave the gift.
  • Keep in Touch – You may feel that the family needs their space and time to grieve, but a simple phone call or note after the funeral lets the family know you care. With social networking leaving a quick note is as simple as a click of a mouse. The months following a death are when grieving friends and family need the most support.

DON'T:

  • Bring your cell phone – Your phone ringing will be highly inappropriate and will cause a disturbance, so turn any ringers or notifications off. Even better, leave your phone at home or in your car, a funeral is not the time to be texting or checking your messages.
  • Allow your children to be a distraction – From a very young age children are aware of death, and if the funeral is for someone that was close to them (grandparent, aunt, uncle) they should be given the option to attend. However if it is not appropriate for your child to be there, and if you feel they will cause a commotion, leave them with a babysitter.
  • Be afraid to remember the good times – Funerals are obviously a time of grieving and mourning, but remembering the good times helps with the healing process. Sharing a funny and appropriate story is acceptable, and in some cases exactly what the deceased would have wanted.
  • Overindulge - If food or drink is served, do not overdo it. Have a bite to eat before you go to the service, you do not want to be that guy parked at the snack table. If alcohol is served, limit yourself to one or two, do not become inebriated and risk doing something inappropriate.

Visit their website to learn more about pre-planning a funeral and grief support, as well as the traditional funeral and cremation services that they have to offer. They are always there to help. Check out their listing on Trusted Saskatoon to read more reviews and to see all the services they offer. 

Saskatoon Funeral Home is your Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 


Trusted Saskatoon Funeral Home Provides Information On Cremation Services

Since 1910, Saskatoon Funeral Home has responded to the needs of Saskatoon & area citizens of every faith and every walk of life. They have a proud history as Saskatoon's longest-serving, local, family-owned and operated, full-service funeral and cremation provider to trace its roots to the beginning days of our city. Saskatoon Funeral Home are a Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. In their latest article, they provide important information about their creation services. 


Cremation Services

Cremation is an alternative to the burial process and it is chosen by many people because of religious beliefs, the desire to preserve the environment or it was requested by the person who died. Cremation is often a less expensive option in comparison to a burial, mainly due to less professional fees from the funeral home, a more basic casket choice, and reduced cemetery costs. At the funeral home, the deceased is placed in a container or casket that is combustible. The casket is then placed in a cremation chamber at the crematorium where through intense heat is reduced to bone fragments that are then processed to resemble course sand.  The cremated remains of an average adult body will weigh about 7-8 pounds. Cremation is not an alternative to a funeral, but rather an alternative to burial or other forms of disposition.

Cremated remains can be scattered or buried, or they may be kept with the family in a decorative urn. There are many new and different ways to memorialize: cremated remains can be placed in an artificial coral reef in the ocean, they can be launched into space or sent up in helium balloons, or they can be spun into glass pieces of art or diamonds.

Some religions welcome cremation while others forbid it. The Catholic Church had banned cremation up until 1963, and burial remains the preferred form of disposition today. If cremation is chosen in the Catholic funeral, the church advises that the cremated remains are to be buried in a cemetery. In other Christian denominations, cremation was historically discouraged but nowadays it is more widely accepted. In eastern religions such as Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism cremation is mandated, while in Islam it is strictly forbidden. Orthodox Jewish faith also forbids cremation; other sects of Judaism support cremation, but burial remains the preferred option.

Cremation FAQ

What is Cremation?

Cremation is the process of reducing the human body to bone fragments using high heat and flame.

Is a casket needed for Cremation?

No, a casket is not required. An alternative container constructed of wood or cardboard is necessary in Saskatchewan. The funeral home has a number of choices to suit any budget.

Is embalming required prior to cremation?

No, embalming is not required. But you may choose to have embalming if there will be an extended time before viewing, or if there will be a traditional funeral followed by cremation.


Can the deceased be viewed without embalming?

Yes, often family members will choose to view the deceased at the funeral home prior to cremation, to say a final goodbye. In Saskatchewan, visual identification is required by law prior to the funeral home booking the cremation with the crematorium. Sometimes this can be done at the time the deceased is transferred from the place of death, otherwise, the visual identification will be done at the funeral home.

Can the family witness the cremation?

Yes, they can; family members may choose to be present when the body is placed in the cremation chamber.  Some religious groups even include this as part of their funeral custom.


Can an urn be brought into church?

Nearly all Churches allow for the urn to be present during the memorial service. Most Catholic Churches also allow the remains to be present during the Memorial Mass. Orthodox Churches encourage families to have the deceased present at the funeral in a casket.


What can be done with the cremated remains?

While laws vary province by province, for the most part, cremated remains can be buried in a cemetery lot or a cremation garden, interred in a columbarium, kept at home or scattered.  Other options to consider are to separate a portion of the cremated remains as a keepsake, choosing keepsake jewellery, blown glass, and a number of other options your funeral director can discuss with you.

How can I be sure I receive the correct cremated remains?

All cremation providers in Saskatchewan follow a rigorous set of operating policies and procedures set out in the Saskatchewan Funeral and Cremation Act in order to maximize the level of service and minimize the potential for human error. A numbered stainless steel identification disc follows the deceased through the entire process and is returned with the cremated remains.


How long does the actual cremation take?

Timing depends on the weight of the individual, and a number of other factors including the cremation container provided. For an average-sized adult, cremation can take two to three hours at a normal operating temperature of between 1,000 and 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit.


What do the cremated remains look like?

Cremated remains resemble coarse sand and are whitish to light grey in colour. The remains of an average-sized adult usually weigh between 7 and 8 pounds.


Do I need an urn?

An urn is not required by law. However, an urn may be desired if there is to be a memorial service or if the remains are to be interred in a cemetery. If an urn is not purchased or provided by the family, the cremated remains will be returned in a temporary container.


Visit their website to learn more about pre-planning a funeral and grief support, as well as the traditional funeral and cremation services that they have to offer. They are always there to help. Check out their listing on Trusted Saskatoon to read more reviews and to see all the services they offer. 

Saskatoon Funeral Home is your Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 


Trusted Saskatoon Funeral Home Provides Important Guidelines For When Death Occurs

Since 1910, Saskatoon Funeral Home has responded to the needs of Saskatoon & area citizens of every faith and every walk of life. They have a proud history as Saskatoon's longest-serving, local, family-owned and operated, full-service funeral and cremation provider to trace its roots to the beginning days of our city. Saskatoon Funeral Home are a Trusted Saskatoon funeral home.


 In their latest article on funerals, they provide important guidelines regarding what to do when a death occurs.

When Death Occurs 

No matter if a death is sudden, or if it is something that was a long time coming, the loss of a loved one makes us feel emotional and overwhelmed. No amount of preparation can fully prepare you for the loss of a loved one. When you are in a heightened emotional state, even the most basic decisions can seem staggering. The following is a rough guideline of what needs to be done within the first 24 hours after death.


When a death occurs at home or a place of business


If the person was not under palliative home care, the police will have to be notified immediately. The police will be dispatched to the home and place the call to the coroner. From there the coroner determines whether further action is necessary. The coroner must release the deceased before a funeral home can do anything. If the person was under palliative home care, contact the home care representative if they were not present and they will notify family members what the proper procedures are to follow.


When a death occurs at a hospital/nursing home/hospice facility


The staff of a care facility such as a hospital or a nursing home will notify you and the necessary authorities immediately after a death has occurred. If a funeral home name has been provided to the hospital or nursing home, they will be notified at the time of death. If you are present at the hospital when the funeral home representative arrives, they will ask a few questions about the deceased wishes and set up a time to come into the funeral home to make arrangements, however, if you are not present a funeral director will contact you by telephone to discuss these arrangements.

Informing a Funeral Director


Once everything has been cleared with the proper authorities, the next call you place should be to a licensed funeral director.  Funeral directors are here to help you obtain a death certificate, transport the deceased, and in the event, pre-planning was not done, select a casket/urn and arrange the funeral/memorial service. Funeral directors are here to help and advise you and will work very hard to relieve the stress and logistics involved in funeral planning.


Meeting a Funeral Director


You should meet with a funeral director within 24 hours of a death to begin to make final arrangements for your loved one.  Deciding on these final arrangements may seem like a very daunting task, especially when you are in a heightened emotional state, but, funeral home staff have years of experience dealing with these issues, and strive to ensure everything goes as smoothly as possible.


Making Arrangements


First, the Funeral Director will gather the information required for registering the death. This includes:

  • Full Name and Address
  • Marital Status
  • Date and Place of Birth
  • Father’s Name, Mother’s Name (including maiden name)
  • Birthplaces of Father and Mother
  • Name of Spouse (if married or widowed, including maiden name)
  • Occupation
It is advisable to bring in a copy of the will if it is available to show who is the Executor in charge of making funeral arrangements.

If no pre-planning has been done, necessary arrangements need to be made for the funeral service. These include:
  • Scheduling the location, date, and time of the visitation and funeral service
  • Selecting burial or cremation
  • Choosing Funeral Products
  • Arranging a cemetery plot if requested
  • Preparing an obituary notice
  • Scheduling transportation arrangements
A funeral director will guide you through all these steps, using your wants, needs, and desires as a foundation to create a memorable funeral for your loved one. From here the funeral services can be personalized. Did your loved one have a favorite sports team? What was their favorite type of music? What activity was your loved one known best for? Recalling fond memories assists with the grieving process and will help honor the life of your loved one.

For more information on planning a memorable goodbye see Saskatoon Funeral Home's helpful guide.


Visit their website to learn more about pre-planning a funeral and grief support, as well as the traditional funeral and cremation services that they have to offer. They are always there to help. Check out their listing on Trusted Saskatoon to read more reviews and to see all the services they offer. 

Saskatoon Funeral Home is your Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 






Trusted Saskatoon team welcome Saskatoon Funeral Home, your Trusted Saskatoon Funeral Home

The Trusted Saskatoon Directory Team is thrilled to share the many reasons we are proud to welcome Saskatoon Funeral Home to the Trusted Community of locally owned businesses operated with integrity. They are your Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 




A History Of Professionalism, Outstanding Service & Compassionate Care  


For over 110 years, the Saskatoon Funeral Home has responded to the needs of Saskatoon people of every faith and every walk of life. The late William A. Edwards founded the business in 1910, the start of a proud history as Saskatoon's longest-serving locally-owned, family-operated, full-service funeral and cremation provider to trace its roots to the beginning days of our city. Saskatoon Funeral Home is a family-operated, full-service funeral and cremation provider. They offer a full range of services, including pre-arranging, traditional and nontraditional services for all faiths and philosophies.

The initial location was 114 - 2nd Ave. South ). William soon moved the business to a large house at 412 - 22nd St. East (now Saskatoon Square).  The current downtown location is a distinctive mid-century modern building. It is worth noting that SFH is the only Saskatoon funeral provider with 24-hour onsite attendance and guardianship for loved ones.

Meet The Edwards 

The Edwards family is steadfastly committed to compassion, dignity, integrity and professional excellence.  

The Founder of Saskatoon Funeral Home, William A. Edwards, was born in Ontario in 1886. He apprenticed in the profession under his father and at 20 years of age came west working his way to the coast and back to Saskatoon, where he established the business of W.A. Edwards Funeral Director in 1910.  His son,  Arnold led a long and meaningful career in funeral service both locally and provincially. A life member of the Saskatchewan Funeral Service Association, he is recognized as always subscribing to the highest ideals and ethical standards in the profession, serving as Instructor and Examiner and Chairman of the Public Information Committee. The business is in the SABEX Hall of Fame Award and was the recipient of The Community Involvement Awards from SABEX and ABEX. Arnold also received the Rotary Golden Wheel Award for Vocational Service. 


A Fourth-Generation Family Business That Gives Back 


Arnold's son Bill and his wife Eleanor Edwards have deep roots in Saskatoon, and they are known for their generosity and sense of community. That's why the couple was honoured with the joint title of CTV's 2011 Citizen of the Year. They've contributed to the city in many ways through not only their businesses but by volunteering their time to various groups and organizations. Bill coached various sports teams and Eleanor volunteered with organizations such as Meals on Wheels. They also created bereavement support organizations, such as the Walk of Memories, Children and Grief, and Motherless Daughters.

Eleanor and Bills son Morgan Edwards joined the family business in 2006 and he represents the fourth generation in the family business. Morgan is the general manager, funeral director, and embalmer. Bill's siblings Brenda and David also serve on the Board.  



To the Edwards Family and Saskatoon Funeral Home, business and community are intertwined. It has always meant a real commitment to the betterment of the community and its people on an economic, spiritual and social level. They believe their success is not achieved through the success of one individual but by the combined efforts of many over a long period of time. 

We can certainly attest to the success of their collective efforts, as the clients we spoke to as part of the Trusted verification process had nothing but wonderful things to say about the Saskatoon Funeral Home team.  The consistent theme was that the staff truly care and do their best to make an awful and emotional time less stressful.  

"Morgan Edwards handled our mother's funeral with so much compassion and dignity. The immediate family was unable to attend due to Covid-19 restrictions, but he made every effort to include us in the service" - Verna T
As we do our due diligence and look at reviews as part of our process we found this one on Google that really summed up what we were hearing from everyone we spoke to. 

"A wonderful help and support for our family during the planning of my fathers celebration of life. He was able to adeptly navigate a complicated family dynamic, create space for everyone to be heard and pulled together the service in record time. He also offered me a shoulder to cry on and instinctively knew what I needed to hear to start processing my grief.
Thank you from the bottom my heart for your kind and compassionate support. We are so lucky to have your support." 
During the pandemic, gathering limit restrictions that were in place for months meant many  ' traditional funeral gatherings' were not able to take place. They announced early on that Saskatoon Funeral Home was waiving all fees associated with digital viewing as they prepared for more families to use the streaming service during funerals. They also have a robotic device called telepresence— a technology on wheels with an attached Ipad.  A family member can control the device and talk with funeral guests and even potentially give a eulogy. 

In an interview with CTV, Morgan Edwards said 

“We have the tools in place to accommodate and we want to still feel like we are doing something to help our friends and neighbours. We have a duty to commemorate a life and that shouldn’t be taken away by the times,” 

Visit their website to learn more about pre-planning a funeral and grief support, as well as the traditional funeral and cremation services that they have to offer. They are always there to help. Check out their listing on Trusted Saskatoon to read more reviews and to see all the services they offer. 

Saskatoon Funeral Home is your Trusted Saskatoon funeral home. 


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S & E Trusted Online Directories Inc
TrustedSaskatoon.com
310 Wall St #209
Saskatoon, SK   S7K 1N7
Ph: 306.244.4150

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