Trusted Tips and Resources

Trusted Tips & Resources

Trusted Saskatoon Jewellers at Batemans Share The History Of Platinum

Bateman Jewellers are Trusted Saskatoon jewellery experts! Did you know that they are the oldest independent jewellery store in Saskatoon?  Bateman Jewellers maintain that the relationship with their clients is very important to them. In their latest Saskatoon jewellery tip they share the interesting history of the metal platinum. 

THE HISTORY OF PLATINUM 

Today, we take for granted that platinum is a coveted precious metal but do you know how long it has been around? 

The answer may surprise you - It was declared a precious metal in just 1751 

By comparison, Ancient Egyptians began using gold and silver to decorate sacred objects since around 3,000 BC. 
From 2551 BC to 2490 BC, they capped the Pyramids of Giza with solid gold, the ultimate sign of the metal’s importance and value. So if like us here at Batemans you are curious about platinum metal history read on! 

Incognito Platinum Metal

Platinum’s  history slipped into human use as a by-product of gold and silver mining. 

Gold was found with platinum and the two blended as they were hammered into shape. 

Platinum was thought to be silver — even though it was much harder. 

Chemists have identified platinum mixed with gold in items dating back to Egypt’s Middle Kingdom (1991-1718 BC). One example is the gold and “silver” cover on the 700 BCE Egyptian Casket of Thebes. An early examiner noted that while some of the silver was heavily oxidized, curiously enough, other “silver” was unaffected. In 1901, French chemist, Marcellin Berthelot, tested the metal and learned that the untarnished silver metal was a combination of platinum, iridium, and gold. 


White Specks and “Little Silver”

Across the Atlantic, archaeologists discovered Pre-Columbian sacred and decorative pieces made of gold with distinctive white specks. These were identified as platinum. In 16th century South America, Spanish conquistadors searched rivers and streams for gold and silver the Spanish King so desperately needed. In the process, they found chunks of platinum. Alas, they called it “platina,” meaning “little silver” and discarded it with no idea it was rare and valuable.

A Hard Fact

To call platinum “little silver” is insulting enough and that isn’t the worst of platinum metal history. In 1735, Antonio de Ulloa, a Spanish scientist, naval general, and explorer, visited Ecuador on a scientific mission. He encountered “platina” in gold mines where it was considered a gold “impurity.” Some thought it was “unripe gold,” and put it back in the mine or ground to “ripen” believing it would yellow with age. Intrigued, de Ulloa undertook to study it. He identified platinum as a separate metal that occurred with gold in alluvial deposits. Indeed, Ulloa found it extremely hard and invulnerable to heat which made it almost impossible to separate from gold nuggets. He observed that platinum was a “nuisance” or “hindrance” that interfered with gold mining. The Spanish abandoned some gold mines with high concentrations of this “nuisance.”

Precious Platinum Metal

In 1751, Swedish scientist, Henrik Scheffer, published the results of his platinum studies. He called it “white gold” and stated that it was:
  • Hard but malleable with the hardness of malleable iron.
  • A precious metal with durability and corrosion resistance similar to gold.
  • Unlike any of the six “old metals” because it is entirely precious containing no copper, tin, lead, iron, or mercury. Scheffer declared it a “seventh metal.”
  • Fusible with arsenic.

Workable? Well . . .

In 1786, Francois Chabaneau, a French chemist working for Charles III of Spain, developed a technique for creating somewhat workable platinum but the results were highly inconsistent. At one point, a story says he grew so frustrated with platinum that he trashed the lab given him by the King. That same year, Antoine Lavoisier, “the father of modern chemistry,” succeeded in melting tiny quantities of platinum, but not enough to work with.

Who Is Marc Etienne Janety?

Monsieur Janety was Louis XVI’s, Royal Goldsmith. He created a platinum and glass sugar bowl for the king whose beauty caused Louis XVI to famously declare that platinum was:

 “ The only metal fit for Kings.” 

In 1794, a year after the revolutionary government executed Louis XVI, Janety prudently left Paris. In 1796, he returned to create the revolutionary government’s official kilogram and meter measures out of platinum because it was the most durable and corrosion-resistant metal.




Pure Platinum

Above, we mentioned Chabaneau’s efforts to create workable platinum. The results proved inconsistent because he didn’t realize that platinum ore contained other platinum group metals — osmium, iridium, rhodium, and palladium. In the early 1800s, an English chemist, William Wollaston, found a way to produce pure platinum on a commercial scale. He kept his technique secret until just before his death.

The Heat Is On

In the waning years of the 19th century, new high-temperature blowtorches made it possible to work platinum into fine jewelry. Cartier in Paris and Tiffany & Co in New York took the lead, making platinum jewelry a status symbol. Many famous stones are set in platinum — including the Hope Diamond — are set in platinum. Nothing less will do for beauty, strength, purity, and natural white colour.

Platinum Metal Strength

Today it holds its status as the elite precious metal chosen by celebrities. It has also become the symbol of the exclusive credit cards, programs, and so on. Yet thanks to advances in technology and techniques — not to mention that its price per ounce is significantly lower than gold — platinum is available to many more customers and very popular in bridal rings. Can anything match the platinum solitaire?

Platinum: The Hypoallergenic Metal

Over the decades, we’ve learned much more about platinum. One discovery stands out: it’s hypoallergenic. This makes it a prime consideration for customers with sensitivities to nickel and copper.





sited by May 31, 2019, By Elizabeth Raffel 

Kitchen and Bath Classics Trusted Saskatoon Bathroom Pros Share The Top 5 Bathroom Design Trends of 2020

Whether you are building a new home In Saskatoon or remodelling a single room, the team at  Kitchen & Bath Classics Saskatoon are a a Trusted Saskatoon Bathroom Store offer you one of the largest selections of plumbing fixtures, faucets, lighting and accessories from quality brand names,. Their showroom displays the latest trends and cutting-edge styles. In their latest offering they share their top 5 trends for bathroom design in 2020 

2020 Bathroom Design Trends. 



 Here's a breakdown of the latest bathroom trends according to design industry experts.  

Design Your Saskatoon Bathroom With The 2020 Pantone Colour Of The Year- Classic Blue.

Classic blue represents a “brings a sense of peace and tranquillity to the human spirit”. It makes perfect sense that colour with that meaning behind it would be chosen for a place of rest and tranquillity—the bathroom.
Depending on your style and taste, Classic Blue can be used in a variety of ways. For example, a popular way to include colour in the bathroom is through tiles, either for the flooring or in the shower. You can also include a Classic Blue bathroom vanity if you want a pop of colour against flat neutrals that can use a bit of edge. If you’re feeling extra daring, you can even paint an entire bathroom Classic Blue! But we know that not everyone can commit to a paint job in a bold colour. If you want to incorporate the 2020 Colour Of The Year in smaller steps, you can try adding towels, flowers and paintings. 

Design With The Hottest Faucet Finish in 2020: Matte Black


The bathroom is a great place to experiment with matte black finishes. You can change your current faucet, showerhead, handheld showerhead, handles, pulls and lighting to this popular finish and see your bathroom transform from ordinary to extraordinarily modern.

Matte black finishes have been perfected to meet the needs of bathroom users, so you don’t need to worry about the finishes wearing off. Many luxury and mid-range brands are adding even more matte black faucets and accessories to their lineup, giving you a large selection to choose from in 2020.

Design Au Naturel and Eco-Friendly


Let your mind be free in the serenity of greenery in the bathroom. Between the hardness of bathroom finishes and materials, it's a much-welcomed idea to have plants and foliage in the bathroom. Bathroom plants are great to freshen the air, add some softness and of course, colour.

The new year also brings focus to creating an eco-friendly bathroom by changing out inefficient faucets and plumbing fixtures. 


Here are some bathroom features to think about:
  • Change out your toilet to a low-flow model
  • Install a low-flow showerhead that works on magnetized poles, like ones from American Standard
  • Get a motion-activated faucet so there’s less water wasted between washing your hands and brushing your teeth
  • Choose quartz countertops as opposed to other materials. Quartz impacts the environment significantly less than other materials

Design In Plain Sight


Here’s what’s funny about bathrooms—there are certain things we want to show off about them, like beautiful tile work in the shower or a gorgeous clawfoot bathtub. But there are other things we don’t necessarily love to look at...like plumbing and drains.

But what if they were designed to be extra pleasing to the eye? That’s what 2020 is all about.

Exposed plumbing is a rising trend. Bathroom brands are now creating industrial-inspired pipe systems that are meant to be shown off in an array of beautiful finishes. You don’t have to hide away complicated pipe systems behind drywall anymore!

As for drains, bathroom brands and designers have found a clever way to hide them in plain sight. Many shower drains can now be designed to look as though they are part of the shower tile or shower floor. The result is a sleek look that doesn’t distract!

You can even go as far as a wall-hung toilet to remove the bulk and clutter of a toilet septic tank. Bathroom brands like TOTO are trailblazing this 2020 toilet trend. It’s also great for smaller spaces where a tank can take up precious square footage.

Design Your Bathroom With Colours, Wallpaper and Fun!


Step outside your comfort zone in the colours and designs you choose for your bathroom. Break out of traditional neutrals in the bathroom and experiment with pops of colour in textiles, accents of paint colour and even wallpaper. Yes, wallpaper...But don’t think it’s the same type of wallpaper from your grandparents’ homes.

Wallpapers come in so many varieties these days. You can choose anything from gentle geometric patterns to bold prints and textures. But a great alternative to wallpaper is a nice tile. Tiles also come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colours for any project. The options are endless.


Design Your Bathroom With Kitchen and Bath Classics Saskatoon 


If you're considering a bathroom remodel or renovation, contact Trusted Saskatoon Bathroom Experts at Kitchen & Bath Classics today!

Trusted Saskatoon Jewellers at Batemans share a Tip about Hand Sanitizer Effect On Jewellery

Bateman Jewellers are Trusted Saskatoon jewellery experts! Did you know that they are the oldest independent jewellery store in Saskatoon?  Bateman Jewellers maintain that the relationship with their clients is very important to them, and Trusted Saskatoon is sure you have heard Cam say in his well-known radio ads 

'Your jewellery is a lifetime investment; Buy it from a lifetime friend. ' 

What Does Hand Sanitizer Do to Our Jewellery?


In the past few weeks, you've probably increased your use of hand sanitizer and other soaps due to the global spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19 for short). But while all of those disinfecting agents are protecting you, they might be hurting something else—your jewellery.


In Batemans latest jewellery tip they share an article from JCK Online - a North American Jewellery Industry website. 




On the best days, many of us are germaphobes. My obsession with keeping germs at bay went into overdrive when I became a mom, and then throw in a pandemic, and I’m considering fashioning myself a hand sanitizer holster. Oh yeah, I’d wear it.
Years ago when I worked in retail, even then I had a small bottle of hand sanitizer close at hand. I remember being told that too much could eat away at the rhodium plating on my ring (I had a white gold wedding set at that time). Still, a quick rub here and there kept my hands feeling clean, and, though my ring definitely bled yellow over time, it’s hard to know if that was the reason why—or if it was just general wear and tear.


Currently, constant hand-washing and sanitizing isn’t just for peace of mind; it’s highly recommended. I don’t even want to write the word COVID-19—I swear it echoes in my dreams. But it’s keeping us prudently cleaning our hands, and in turn, cleaning our jewelry, too—at least, the pieces we wear on our fingers.
Let me please preface this by saying that yes, you should absolutely positively wash wash wash, spray spray spray, scrub scrub scrub—whatever keeps your hands clean. Jewelry is precious, that is true, but your health is all the more so.
However, given that I’m sporting a newly redesigned wedding ring, I can’t help but wonder what I might be doing to it with my constant use of chemicals. Am I causing damage?

I always take my ring off to shower, lotion, make meatballs—you get it. Not trying to gunk up the jewels here! But I almost never take it off to wash my hands, and certainly not to sanitize. I’m betting most wearers are the same.
I spoke with Shan Aithal, a metallurgist at Stuller, to get the dirt (pardon the pun) on keeping hands—and rings—clean. 

“To my knowledge, hand sanitizers are not capable of removing tough, albeit thin, rhodium that’s on a piece of jewelry,” says Aithal. “Hand sanitizers come in two varieties: alcohol-based and non–alcohol-based. The ones with alcohol are benign to jewelry items as alcohol is the main germ-killing ingredient. However, non–alcohol-based ones typically use chlorine-based compounds as germicides. These chlorine compounds could react with water and release free chlorine. Free chlorine radical is very reactive and could cause tarnishing of jewelry, especially if it is made of sterling silver. Also, halogens are known to cause stress corrosion cracking in low karat golds, in particular, nickel white golds.”

It is worth noting, in this case, that the CDC recommends using alcohol-based hand sanitizers with at least 60% alcohol content. As long as you’re doing that, your metal will probably stay in great shape.
Soaps, according to Aithal, are a different story. “Soaps can contain abrasives, like Lava or that orange goo dispensed near hand-washing stations, that could damage the surface of jewelry and cause rhodium to be worn away.”

What about diamonds and sapphires? 


It won’t damage them but can leave a filmy residue on the stones over time, dulling the sparkle. But it’s not permanent, and nothing a quick soak in an ultrasonic can’t fix.


“If anything, people should be cleaning their jewelry more,” says Susi Smither, founder of The Rock Hound. “Think of all that horrid buildup of crud under rings and behind the setting of claw-set earrings. Hand sanitizer kills the baddies then evaporates fast—this shouldn’t have any detrimental effects on your gemstones, even materials such as gemstones and pearls. If you’re worried, at the end of the day give them a rinse and dry when you get home.”


Peggy Grosz, senior vice president at Assael, suggests erring more on the side of caution when it comes to pearls. 

“Sanitized skin should not come into contact with your pearls until completely dry and evaporate—wait about five minutes before putting on your pearls,” says Grosz. “As with perfumes and hairspray, the alcohol in the hand sanitizer can change the surface of the pearl, the two noticeable differences being a loss of lustre and a change in colour—white pearls, for example, will become yellowed if repeatedly exposed to such chemicals. Pearl rings should be removed when applying hand sanitizer, but because they have a mounting which separates them from direct contact with the chemicals, it is safe to put rings back on after a few minutes.”

Bottom line? Most, if not all, jewellery will be just fine, lovers of Georgian and early Victorian pieces should  take special care as water can get into rings with closed-back mountings and affect the appearance of the stones. Also, locket rings or any ring that has a photo of some other decoration under glass should not be washed with water.

But of course, sometimes the simplest advice is the best. When in doubt, it is always better to take your rings off before washing your hands.!


 If you are resting your rings on the sink while you scrub, please be sure the drain is closed, okay


Bateman Jewellers is a Trusted Saskatoon Jewellery Store 




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Treeternity your Trusted Saskatoon Memorial Forest Explains How Millennials Are Changing The Death Care Industry

Thought about Planting a Tree For A Loved One? Treeternity is a Trusted Saskatoon Memorial forest and they offer an eco-friendly, modern way to celebrate an event, loved one, pet or family with a tree and plaque in a beautiful park. Treeternity, allows you to celebrate or remember an important person or aspect of your life in an environmentally positive way. In their latest tip they explain how millennials are affecting the funeral and death care industry.  

Millennials Are Changing The Death Care Industry

Everywhere you turn, you’re liable to see another article about how millennials are killing industries. These articles might carry a healthy dose of generational skepticism, but they do have a point - the way millennials spend is quite different than how preceding generations did. CBS Insights attributes this behaviour to a confluence of different factors. Two of the principal factors they looked at were economic differences between the generations and a greater desire to spend ethically. 

Here, we examine how these two factors, as well as changing spiritually, might affect millennial spending in the death care industry. We’re using this analysis in an attempt to predict how millennials might spend money on their own funerals or the funerals of loved ones who are around the same age. This analysis is focused on North American millennials.


Millennials and Spirituality


Millennials are less religious than preceding generations. Some might interpret that as a decline in spirituality, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. On factors from a sense of wonder and awe about the universe, to questioning the purpose of life, Millennials respond in ways that are very similar to the generations that came before them. What’s more, Millennials are actually more likely to believe in an afterlife than older generations. 

Spirituality plays an important role in death care, so it’s important to think about how a decline in religiosity coupled with stable trends in spirituality might play out. One might conclude that certain practices that are seen as dogma won’t appeal as much to Millennials, but novel practices that suit their spiritual framework will. The Catholic practice of preferring burial and dissuading cremation may, for example, be less compelling when fewer Millennials are religious.

This isn’t to say we can expect burial to drop off entirely; the value of tradition is often misunderstood and understated. One can expect burials for preceding generations, even in funeral services arranged for by Millennials. We may also see new traditions that merge the religious beliefs of older generations with the spirituality of Millennials.

Millennials and Economics


Understanding the economy and the role Millennials play in it is exceedingly difficult. Individual Millennials seem to earn less, but Millennial households often earn more - in large part because of the role women play in earning income. That said, as day to day costs continue to go up, Millennials are spending less; a trend we might be safe to assume is going to continue.

You can already see the impacts of less spending on the death care industry: more than 60% of Canadians are choosing cremation. The reason? For 40% of those choosing it, it’s because it’s less expensive than burial. This is yet another trend that leads us to believe cemeteries and burial will be less and less common as time goes on.


Millennials and Ethics



An astonishing 73% of Millennials are willing to pay more for sustainable products.

Defining sustainability isn’t simple, but we can conceptualize it as meeting the needs of the present without sacrificing the future. Environmental causes are intimately linked with sustainability. In many frameworks, humanitarian causes are too: Millennials will consider whether or not products are Fair Trade and cruelty-free in an effort to support sustainable development for people around the world. These considerations have important implications for death care.

Burial has a number of negative ecological impacts, stemming largely from the use of embalming fluids and other toxic chemicals. What’s more, as urban populations continue to swell, cemeteries are taking up valuable real estate - soon, Millennials may not even have a place to be buried. In light of this, many Millennials are turning to alternatives. That’s not to say cremation is going to be the only way to go - there are environmental problems with that, too, but again, we see a trend away from traditional burials.

Millennials and Experiences


Millennials, as you may have heard, spend more on experiences than things. As it turns out, this trend isn’t limited to Millennials; every generation is spending more on experiences and there’s good evidence that indicates that experiences make us happier than things. One might think of a funeral as an experience (albeit one full of very strong emotions), but we may be able to glean information about how this trend will shape funerals.

While funerals can be thought of like experiences, they are experiences that feature a lot of stuff, much of it very expensive. From caskets to flowers, you have to purchase a lot of things for a traditional funeral, and the trend of eschewing expensive products might mean Millennials will place less value on how nice their casket is. This leads us to predict, once again, that traditional burials will continue to decline; when you don’t feel the need for your own plot after you’ve passed away, cemeteries can seem like the product of a bygone era.

Millennials and Memorial Forests


Millennials, then, are looking for ethical experiences that don’t cost a lot and that are tied to their spirituality. This is exactly what a memorial forest provides. When a loved one passes, a tree grows in memory of them. The tree is in a forest with winding paths, memorializing many others; it’s a serene place where families can spend time together. This ties together cause of environmental justice and creates an experience of togetherness; all this, and we haven’t even started talking about the grand metaphors that can be drawn. The memorialization is far less expensive than a traditional burial, too. In other words, memorial forests appeal to Millennials on each of the points we’ve discussed here. 

While predicting trends with 100% certainty isn’t possible, it’s safe to conclude that if traditional burials and cemeteries are on the decline, as we assume they are, we’ll see other traditions taking their place. Having literal family trees? That’s a tradition that could appeal to everyone. - Mia Hollinger , Founder - Treeternity. 

Check out Treeternity's listing by clicking on the link below, read reviews and see all they do - then contact Mia to get the process started today. 

Treeternity is your Trusted Saskatoon Memorial Forest

Trusted Saskatoon Caterer Chef de Partie Catering & Events Announce The Opening Of Their Unique Tasting Room


Chef de Partie Catering is a private catering company with commercial kitchens in the heart of the downtown Saskatoon business district.  Owned by Chef Heather Bekar-Schulte and specializing in creating high-quality dishes with fresh, local ingredients and uncommon flair. Heather and her passionate team cater to local events, corporate parties and weddings, they also produce amazing pastries and build one-of-a-kind wedding cakes. In their latest article Trusted Saskatoon Caterer Chef de Partie Catering & Events share their unique tasting room experience!!

Visit, Taste & Shop Local With Chef De Partie


The Chef de Partie family is committed to the collaborative growth of local partnerships in the food, farming and artisan community of Saskatchewan. They would like to introduce the Trusted Saskatoon audience to their new tasting room and what is in store behind that beautiful door!!!


PRIVATE TASTING ROOM EXPERIENCE


Under a gorgeous central, beam and cable light fixture, they have installed a family-style harvest table available for private dinner bookings and food tastings with their Chef and culinary team. 
Up to 12 guests can dine in the speakeasy type atmosphere, off the beaten path where every seat is at the Chef's table. Alternatively, they can host up to 25 guests for intimate cocktail receptions.

SASKATOON’S MOST SELECT PRIVATE DINING


A ground-breaking concept that is a must-try, their private tasting room offers an unparalleled experience behind closed doors away from the clash of the outside world. We specialize in living micro-greens, artisan cheese, pasture-raised meats and phenomenal dessert. Experiment with some of the finest food Saskatchewan has to offer. Chef Heather creates tasting plates and local ingredient menu combinations with an adventurous tilt. Find the flavour that piques your palette and share the experience with your friends and family. 


A NIGHT TO REMEMBER - Event Hosting


The perfect atmosphere for your next event. Intimate weddings, company socials, bridal showers, gentlemen’s night out, or even your next date, all will be intrigued by an evening in the Chef de Partie TASTING ROOM.

Chef Heather's inspiration and indeed many elements in the Tasting Room have come straight from the Ostapiw Farms where Chef Heather was born and raised. From barn beams, corral boards, Baba's butter churn to Gido's coat hooks, our space is immersed in the history of our family's agricultural roots. The Chef de Partie family is committed to the collaborative growth of local partnerships in the food, farming and artisan community of Saskatchewan. 

Chef de Partie Catering & Events is a Trusted Saskatoon Caterer 


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