Trusted Tips and Resources

Trusted Tips & Resources

Trusted Saskatoon Realtor Marla Janzen Mystery Shop!

Being a Trusted Business on the Trusted Saskatoon Directory of Excellence comes with a lot of responsibility - no other directory, advertising medium, or 'watchdog organization' puts businesses through the process we do before we promote and endorse them. 

Why Choose a Business On the Trusted Saskatoon Directory? 

All of the Trusted Saskatoon partners have to pass a unique verification process, they are then annually contracted to uphold our 5 Trusted Guarantees. The partners then become part of a local community of Saskatoon and area businesses that we promote with a strong local marketing campaign. We also have a Trusted MYSTERY SHOPPER PROGRAM. This is where we find and engage with normal everyday people, just like you, who are looking for products and services in Saskatoon and area. We approach individuals we can see are looking for a local business and we ask them to mystery shop Trusted Saskatoon Partners. Those that agree to be Trusted mystery shoppers go about their usual business, except at the end they fill out a report to tell us about the experience. We then share it with you! The Trusted Saskatoon Team is thrilled to share our latest mystery shop report about Marla Janzen Real Estate!


Mystery Shop - Marla Janzen Real Estate


Name of Shopper: Janice G.


1. How was the greeting/welcome/call answered?

Warm, professional, and prompt. 

2. Product/industry knowledge of staff?

I felt very confident in her knowledge.

 

3. Overall experience 1-10

10 


4. Would you recommend them to a close friend?

Yes, absolutely! I already have should they ever need her services. 


Please share any other comments relating to your experience with the company. 

Marla, although extremely busy, was very communicative, supportive, and engaging as a professional. Her efforts in research, showings, and the real estate transaction itself were exemplary. Her experience and knowledge are a great asset to her clients. 

CONGRATULATIONS on a successful mystery shop MarlaWe are thrilled to have such amazing Realtors like you on our Saskatoon's directory of excellence!



Marla guarantees to provide you with a stress-free, hassle-free, wonderful experience and we are sure once you have met her that you will not contact anyone else!

Marla Janzen is a Trusted Saskatoon Realtor®

Trusted Saskatoon Realtor Clark Dziadyk’s Home-Buying Checklist for Newcomers

Whether you’re buying a house for the first time, the second or the seventh time, it’s still one of the biggest decisions you ever have to make. In order to ensure sheer success, you need Trusted Saskatoon Realtor Clark Dziadyk! Clark will ease your mind by taking the pressure off of you to find your dream home! Be assured Saskatoon Real Estate Agent Clark Dziadyk puts 100% effort into everything he does. He shares regular Saskatoon Real Estate Expert Tips with us and in his latest tip he shares RBC’s home-buying checklist for newcomers to Saskatoon.



Buying Your First Home in Canada Checklist

Home-Buying Checklist for Newcomers


We know there are some extra challenges to buying a home in a new country. Here are some things you can do to make the home-buying process a little easier:


1. Figure out what you can afford.


Before you start looking for a home, get a general idea of how much you may be able to afford and what your mortgage payments would be. This will help you set a realistic price range so you can balance home ownership with your lifestyle needs.


2. Save for your down payment (if applicable).


Considering the high cost of home ownership in Canada, most newcomers (and most Canadians) don’t pay the full price of their home all at once. Typically, buyers make a down payment on a home using money they've saved and then borrow the rest (through a mortgage) from a lender.


3. Understand your mortgage options.


There are a lot of mortgage features to choose from in Canada, and Saskatoon. Talking to a mortgage specialist is one of the best ways to make sense of all the options, and to help you save money over the lifetime of your mortgage.


4. Get a mortgage pre-approval.


Once you’re ready to buy a home, be sure to get a mortgage pre-approval. A pre-approved mortgage means the bank has made a commitment (subject to conditions such as a property valuation) to loan you the money for your home.


- You’ll know how much you can afford to borrow for your new home.

- You’ll be in a better position to negotiate with sellers once you have found a home.

- You’ll also know your interest rate.


5. Find a Trusted Saskatoon real estate agent.


Hire a reputable local real estate agent Clark Dziadyk! Your agent, like your mortgage specialist, can be an invaluable resource for you throughout the entire home-buying experience.


6. Start your home search!


As you start looking at homes, don’t just think about the type of home you want—also think about your lifestyle and how close you want to live near amenities such as schools, highways, medical services, shopping, restaurants and recreation.



Read what clients have to say about Clark on his listing by clicking on the link below! 


Trusted Saskatoon Realtor Clark Dziadyk Tip For Sellers on Repairs That Are Worth Doing

Whether you’re buying a house for the first time, the second or the seventh time, it’s still one of the biggest decisions you ever have to make. In order to ensure sheer success, you need Trusted Saskatoon Realtor Clark Dziadyk! Clark will ease your mind by taking the pressure off of you to find your dream home! Be assured Saskatoon Real Estate Agent Clark Dziadyk puts 100% effort into everything he does. He shares regular Saskatoon Real Estate Expert Tips with us and in his latest tip he shares repairs that give home sellers high return on investment. 



Repairs That Give Home Sellers High Return on Investment

What Should I Repair On My House in Saskatoon Before Selling?

Many sellers make the mistake of assuming that any repairs they do to their house will automatically increase the money they get for the home. Unfortunately, this assumption can lead to serious upset for those that pour a ton of money into repairs and find they don’t make their money back when they sell.

Some home sellers are smart and will ask a Saskatoon real estate professional their advice before pouring any money into the home. On many occasions, I have been asked what repairs will give the highest return on investment. Some home repairs are apparent winners. Other fixes are harder to know if they will yield positive returns. And some repairs are almost guaranteed to bring frustration because they rarely result in a higher sales price. Some repairs are important to do before selling even though they may not have the highest return on investment. Why? They help the home sell!

Some necessary repairs can prevent a house from selling. Depending on the age and condition of your home, you might want to consider getting your house inspected prior to sale. Not only can you figure out before-hand if they’ll be any unexpected surprises, but you can also address them! The inspection will help in remedying the necessary repairs, but you’ll also be prepared for the buyer’s home inspection. Nobody wants to put their house back on the market due to a bad inspection. The key to picking which repairs is to know what buyers consider important—which may not necessarily be the same things that you think are important. One of the biggest errors sellers make is thinking that the repairs they want are going to be the same that buyers want.

Fortunately, you are doing your research now—before you spend a lot of money on repairs. Read on to learn what repairs yield a solid return on investment.

Factors that Can Affect the Value of Home Repairs

Before digging deeper into which home repairs offer good ROI, it is important to know that there are a variety of factors that must be considered on an individual level—things that may affect your home and repair ROI specifically. These include:

  • When you are selling. The time of year you list your home may affect how much bang for your buck you get with specific home repairs.
  • How the market is doing. A buyer’s market is different than a seller’s market for many reasons. The effect of certain home repairs on your home’s sale value is something that the state of the market will affect.
  • Where your home is located. Buyers value some home repairs differently depending on where the home is being sold. 
  • The completion you face when selling. The homes being sold in the area that is similar to yours always influence the price of your home. The inventory you are competing against will also affect the value buyers place on your home repairs.

Getting a Good Return on Investment—The Repairs Worth Considering


1. Going back to hardwood floors.

There is no denying the appeal of hardwood flooring in today’s market. You will get the highest return on investment from painting. Buyers appreciate the look and the convenience of hardwood flooring and are willing to pay for it. The most cost-effective option for you as the seller is to pull up carpeting from existing hardwood flooring—if you have hardwood flooring underneath your carpets.

Getting hardwood floors re-finished is short money in comparison to what it brings for a return on investment. Even if you don’t re-finish the floors, just pulling up the carpets and showing buyers you have hardwood can make a world of difference. In real estate sales first, impressions are everything. Some buyers have absolutely no vision whatsoever. You can tell them there are hardwood floors under the carpet, but if they can’t see it, then it means nothing.

If you don’t have hardwood, then you will need to consider if installing new hardwood or something similar—like engineered hardwood flooring—would be worth it for your sale. Doing so is a question for your local real estate agent. Only they will know how much of an impact adding hardwood floors will make to your bottom line.

2. Making entertainment areas into hardwood or something similar.

If you do decide to add hardwood floors, the rooms where people spend a lot of time or tend to entertain others are the most popular areas with buyers. For example, most people love seeing hardwood floors in the kitchen, family room, and formal dining room. It can be beneficial to pull up the carpeting in these areas and add engineered hardwood flooring.

The engineered hardwood flooring options are many and can often be purchased for a reasonable price. You can also install them yourself if you are so inclined—which would put even more money in your pocket on the day of sale.

3. Paint the walls and ceilings.

There is nothing more cost effective in home sales than painting. A new coat of paint is one of the cheapest improvements you can make to your home that will make it more appealing to buyers. When buyers come to view your home, they are looking for things to complain about, and nothing is more straightforward to dislike than stains on the walls or the ceilings. Stains and other imperfections stand out, and they make the home seem dirty even if it is otherwise spotless.

Water stains on a ceiling are especially common. More often than not a child has left a curtain partially open while taking a shower. Water stains, however, freak buyers out. Nobody wants to see water stains. The fear is that the stain is not old but an active leak. Other times in cold weather climates it is not uncommon to see a water stain from an old ice dam problem. What ever the case may be it is crucial to take care of removing old water stains.

Add a fresh coat of paint to the walls, remove wallpaper and paint the wood paneling. No one wants to buy a home with old wallpaper on it, and it is hard to find a buyer that finds wood paneling appealing. Painting ceilings is a little more challenging than painting the walls, but it completes the look and ensures that everything looks nice and clean. If you have a popcorn ceiling, you should consider removing them. Just keep in mind that old popcorn ceilings may contain asbestos. Be extremely cautious when removing the old texture or hire a professional that is qualified to do it safely. With newer popcorn texture you can just scrape it off. It is a long process but inexpensive and makes a big difference in how buyers see your home.

4. Be strategic in how you remodel the kitchen.

Kitchen remodels tend to get you your money back when you sell, so they are usually worth doing if the kitchen is dated. However, it is also easy to lose money if you are not careful with how you renovate.

Consider refinishing the cabinets if you can get away with it because replacing them will be expensive. It is challenging to get a return on investment by completely remodelling a kitchen. The kitchen is the most expensive room in the house to renovate. You can easily spend tens of thousands of dollars even on a moderate size kitchen. Believe it or not painting a dark, dated kitchen, however, can completely transform it into something special. If done correctly by a highly skilled painter, it can look like new.

Basic hardware like the sink and faucet can be replaced inexpensively, but try to avoid installing luxurious appliances because buyers may not pay you for them. Installing granite counters in most areas offers significant value. It also impacts how saleable the house will be quite a bit. Depending on the price range buyers expect granite. It is a significant hot button in home sales. The cost of adding granite counters has come down in recent years.

5. Renovate the bathroom if it needs it.

Bathroom renovations also generate positive returns in most cases. A new coat of paint—lighter is better in small spaces—along with new fixtures can all be taken care of without too much expense. HGTV has some excellent examples of remodelled bathrooms under five thousand dollars. Take a look to inspire some thoughts on what to do at your place.

If you cannot get stains off of things like the shower doors, tub or sink, replace the doors and refinish the surfaces.

6. Replace the roof if it needs to be replaced.

If your roof needs to be replaced, you will make the sales process more manageable if you take care of it now. Just because the roof is old does not mean it has to be replaced soon, however. It is in your best interests to have a professional look at your roof and to discuss the results with your Realtor.

A professional roofer will be able to determine if replacement is necessary immediately or if you have a few years left. Generally, a non-architectural roof shingle will last around twenty years. Most architectural shingles will last anywhere from thirty to fifty years.

Buyers may be willing to purchase the home if it has two or three years left on the roof. If the roof needs to be replaced within a year or so, though, you will be better off having the work done prior to listing the home. Unfortunately, roofs do not have a high return on investment when you are selling a house. Most of the time when I am counselling sellers my advice will be to do nothing with the roof. I’ll tell them to expect buyers to want some kind of seller’s concession at closing. Most of the time you will be far better off negotiating a credit than replacing the roof given the cost and what you’ll get back.

7. Clean up the exterior of the home.

Your home’s exterior is the first thing that buyers are going to see when they come to view your home. The little things you do to make the home look nicer at first glance are inexpensive for the most part and can be great for helping your home stand out.

Some of the exterior repairs that you can address may include patching cracks in the sidewalk and driveway, replacing the caulk around your windows, adding new fixtures like doorknobs, painting the front door, fixing broken fences and painting them, planting flowers, adding mulch to flower beds, etc. Here is an excellent list of exterior home staging tips you can use to spruce up your house.

8. Talk to your Realtor before making any repairs.

Your agent should be well-qualified to tell you what exactly you need to do to make your home more marketable. He or she knows the market and has the insight necessary to help in your decision making. What’s important to repair in a house can vary from one market to the next. This is one of the reasons people say all real estate is local. 

Don’t, however, underestimate the things that can make a home sale fall through.

Repairs Without a High Return on Investment But Necessary

There are some repairs needed with a home that doesn’t bring a high rate of return. These are the items that buyers consider are essential to be functioning. They are considered “normal” to be working upon transfer.

Buyers generally will not pay more money for these items. Some of them include:

  • functioning septic system if sewer is not available. New septic systems have a small return on investment.
  • Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in the house that function correctly. Obviously, these items are vital to safety.
  • Any kind of existing significant structural or mechanical defect in the home. For example, if the heating system is failing it would make sense to get it replaced.
  • Any kind of problem that would prevent a buyer from obtaining a mortgage. This one is obvious. You will never sell your house for top dollar if you need a cash sale.
  • If you don’t have public water and your house has a well that is not functioning properly. Buyers expect excellent quality and quantity from their water supply.
  • You know you either have high radon levels in the water or the air. Nearly all buyers will want this corrected before proceeding.
  • A significant electrical issue, especially if it is a fire hazard.

Read what clients have to say about Clark on his listing by clicking on the link below! 

Clark Dziadyk is a Trusted Saskatoon Realtor 


Contact Clark today for your Saskatoon Real Estate needs.


Trusted Saskatoon Realtor Clark Dziadyk Shares Canadian Real Estate Market News

Whether you’re buying a house for the first time, the second or the seventh time, it’s still one of the biggest decisions you ever have to make. In order to ensure sheer success, you need Trusted Saskatoon Realtor Clark Dziadyk! Clark will ease your mind by taking the pressure off of you to find your dream home! Be assured Saskatoon Real Estate Agent Clark Dziadyk puts 100% effort into everything he does. He shares regular Saskatoon Real Estate Expert Tips with us and his latest tip he shares an article from Price Water House Coopers Real estate emerging trend series about real estate markets to watch in 2020.....and they include Saskatoon in their top 10 cities to watch! 


Canadian Real Estate Markets to watch in 2020


Vancouver


"The market rise was too strong, and now it is reacting to that. However, by the time it is done, it will be in line with where a steady increase should have gotten us over the years.”



 Economic growth is moderating in Vancouver. The Conference Board of Canada (CBoC) expects growth to dip to 2.3% in 2019 and continue to average at that rate from 2020-23, down from the 3% rise experienced in 2018. Looking at the Vancouver housing market, total starts will drift downwards over the next few years as a result of ample supply and policy measures aimed at taking more steam out of the sector.

 

Housing prices, particularly for single-family homes, have been decreasing, and sales in the Vancouver area were down significantly at the start of the summer of 2019. The proportion of foreign buyers in the Vancouver housing market has dropped significantly since the BC government introduced a tax on international purchases in 2016.

 

Despite some headwinds, Vancouver re-emerged at the top of our survey this year for overall real estate prospects. The office and industrial sectors are doing particularly well. For office properties in metropolitan Vancouver, the vacancy rate was just 5.3% in the second quarter of 2019, according to JLL Research.

 

Looking at the housing market, the long-term trends remain favourable. Recent softness is largely a reflection of a correction from an overheated environment and policies that have caused investors, whether foreign or domestic buyers, to exit the market.

 

With a strong economy and population growth, Vancouver remains a desirable place to live that will eventually draw buyers back into the market. The question isn’t if, but when, they’ll come back.  


Toronto


“There’s a certain stubbornness that has persisted in the GTA real estate market.”


 

Fuelled in part by immigration that’s helping to make it one of the fastest-growing cities in both Canada and the United States, Toronto continues to have a healthy real estate market. Economic growth is also solid: the CBoC is predicting growth of 2.4% in both 2019 and 2020. While the housing market had declined as a result of policy interventions like the mortgage stress test, sales and prices have been stabilizing. 

 

But affordability remains a significant concern, largely due to a decade of land supply issues, coupled with increased demand for housing as a result of immigration and new household formations. With the cost of land per front foot rising, the impacts of government levies and taxes have only added to the affordability challenge.

 

Toronto’s office market is a major strength, as seen in the continued low vacancy rate and announcements of large-scale developments across the region. Notable among them is a recently announced CA$3.5-billion mixed-use development near the CN Tower that includes two office towers (of 58 and 48 stories), about 800 rental apartments across two buildings and a retail component.

 

A constant top investment and development pick, the industrial sector continues to shine on the back of e-commerce growth. Vacancies are at historic lows in the industrial sector, with average net-asking rents on the rise. Construction activity is strong, with significant new supply expected to come onstream by early 2020.


Ottawa


“Demand is so far outstripping supply, with nothing suggesting this will go away any time soon.”


 

With solid economic growth and a vibrant housing market, Ottawa took third place for real estate prospects in our survey. Migration from other cities, including from Toronto-area residents looking for more affordable housing options, has helped the city’s population surpass the one-million mark. With the city having reached that milestone, interviewees expect larger investment players to come into the market.

 

With so much activity, labour shortages remain a significant issue, as the city grapples with the impact of several large construction projects happening at the same time. And with land supply tight and affordability decreasing, some developers are building townhouses rather than traditional detached homes. 

 

Purpose-built rental housing is also going strong, particularly as rising prices to buy a home push people to look at other options. Notable projects in Ottawa include a new 24-storey co-living development featuring communal apartments alongside traditional rental units. One interviewee believes renting is a long-term trend in Ottawa, with several retail properties being redeveloped to include rental housing.

 

The industrial sector is doing well, and many interviewees noted storage as a strength in a government city that regularly attracts newcomers. According to JLL Research, the office vacancy rate declined to 7.7% in the second quarter of 2019, down from 8.7% in 2018.


Halifax


“Slow and steady wins the race in Halifax.”


 

The Halifax economy is on a steady upward climb, with growth forecasts of 2% in 2019 and 2.6% the year after, according to the CBoC. This comes on the heels of record job creation numbers in 2018.

 

Strong immigration levels are fuelling population gains and demand for homes, particularly when it comes to purpose-built rental and single-family housing. Asked if oversupply is a concern, interviewees said they’re not seeing signs of that happening yet.

 

Interviewees say financing is widely available, as institutional and private investors that have capital to invest still view the local real estate market—especially when it comes to purpose-built rental housing and industrial properties—as profitable. On the office side, absorption of new supply has left some older buildings falling out of favour.

 

Real estate players are actively watching what will happen with proposed new development rules under the city’s Centre Plan. The plan, which updates land-use bylaws and municipal planning strategies, would let developers build bigger towers in the core.

 

Elsewhere in Atlantic Canada, St. John’s is seeing improving prospects as oil companies make long-term commitments through new exploration and move into new office buildings outside of the downtown core.



Montreal


“Montreal feels like it’s on fire.”


 

Montreal is on track for continued economic growth, albeit at slightly lower rates than the 3.4% seen in 2018. The CBoC forecasts growth of 2% in 2019, tapering off slightly to an average of 1.6% from 2020-23.

Major strengths in Montreal’s real estate market include multifamily housing and industrial property. An aging population is among the factors fuelling significant demand for condos, while e-commerce, including the growth of cold storage for grocery deliveries, is giving a boost to industrial real estate. Supply of industrial real estate is tight, with the availability rate falling to just 3.2% in the second quarter of 2019, according to CBRE.

The office market, helped by strong absorptions due in part to a growing technology sector looking for flexible space, has also been healthy. The vibrant market is leading to significant investment and deal activities, including transactions involving large US institutional investors and private equity players that see promise in the region’s stability.

Senior housing is another significant trend, as are residential developments offering curated amenities and services aimed at millennials and active adults who have recently retired.

Despite the optimism, there are concerns about rising construction and labour costs and the potential impacts of the city’s proposed 20-20-20 bylaw. Under the proposal, the city would require developers to set aside certain percentages of new residential developments—or make a financial contribution in lieu—for social, affordable and family-oriented housing.


Saskatoon

" The Housing market is picking up nicely and product is moving! "

 

Saskatoon’s economy continues to expand, with modest growth on the near horizon. According to the CBoC, Saskatoon will see economic growth of 2.3% in 2019 and 1.7% in 2020. 

 

Population growth will outstrip the national average over this period. Housing sales in 2019 have been showing a modest uptick over 2018, with condos contributing to the year-over-year increase. The CBoC predicts housing starts will increase over the coming years, rising to 2,171 units in 2020 from 1,646 in 2019.

 

A three-building, CA$300-million residential and commercial development reached an important milestone in May 2019 with a ceremony to mark the completion of the top floor of one of two office towers.

 

The site’s hotel has already opened, and the smaller of the two office towers should be complete in November. Work on the larger tower, which the CBoC notes is expected to be the tallest building in Saskatchewan, should be complete by 2021.


Quebec city


 

Forecasts by the CBoC suggest Quebec City’s economy will increase by 1.8% in 2019, with annual growth averaging 1.6% from 2020-23. It predicts housing starts will soften in 2019 and remain below 2017 and 2018 levels for the next four years, particularly when it comes to building single-family detached homes.

 

Despite the softness in some parts of the housing market, there’s strength in other areas, as seen in large-scale developments like a CA$550-million commercial and residential development in Lévis. Other major projects include the construction of a new hospital complex.

 

Construction costs are a rising concern. One interviewee pointed to the impact of the hospital project on the price of concrete, while others cited labour shortages as a significant factor behind the cost pressures on real estate projects.

 

Environmental features are another trend in the Quebec City real estate market. Several interviewees noted the rising focus on the inclusion of rooftop urban agriculture and community gardens.

 

Access to transportation is also important, which is an area where Quebec City is making significant investment as it moves forward with its ambitious tramway project. The project, which recently secured funding, has the potential to transform the city and open up new development opportunities.

 



Edmonton


“Although the home builder industry in Alberta has been crippled by fewer residential construction jobs . . . and uncertainty surrounding proposed legislation, we’re hopeful this is the worst and we’ll hit the upswing in 2020.”

 

Edmonton’s economy is expected to grow by 1.3% in 2019, according to the CBoC, as oil production cuts moderate growth in the energy sector. While anticipated austerity by the new provincial government may also affect growth in the city in the near term, the CBoC expects the economy to grow by an average of 2.3% from 2020-23. Despite some headwinds, the Edmonton real estate market is seeing strength in some areas.

 

Construction of a number of new office towers is adding vibrancy to the city’s downtown. While JLL Research reported an office vacancy rate of 17.7% in the second quarter of 2019, the downtown area saw positive net absorption, particularly in the city’s financial district. A wave of completions is putting some pressure on the owners of older buildings to renovate or repurpose them as the city experiences a flight to high-quality office properties.

 

Industrial real estate is doing well, especially in communities outside the city where available land and lower tax rates are helping to stimulate development. As a gateway to northern communities, Edmonton is evolving as a warehousing and distribution centre, as seen in developments like an Amazon facility in Nisku’s Border Business Park that’s expected to open in early 2020.


Winnipeg


 

Like many areas of Canada, Winnipeg’s economic growth has moderated somewhat. According to the CBoC, growth is forecast to come in at 1.9% in 2019 and 1.6% in 2020, down from an average of 3.4% during the previous two years.

 

Strong immigration levels have more than outweighed outflows, helping to fuel solid population growth. While the CBoC projects housing starts to soften in the short term, it expects a sustained rebound from 2020-23. Once complete, a new 40-storey, CA$160-million mixed-use development on Main Street will be Winnipeg’s tallest structure.

 

The industrial market is very strong. The industrial availability rate was just 3.7% in the second quarter of 2019, according to CBRE. Prospects remain solid for the manufacturing sector in Winnipeg, where the average industrial net asking lease rate rose by 2.7% on a year-over-year basis, according to CBRE.


Calgary


“The outcome of decisions on the pipelines will determine our city’s future. I suspect they will be built and that will create jobs and keep us busy.”


 

Calgary is likely to see moderate economic growth again in 2019, with the CBoC forecasting a rise of 1.5%. Further out, it projects annual growth to average 2.5% from 2020-23.

 

Many interviewees are particularly optimistic about the impact of a new provincial government and the possibilities of building long-awaited energy pipelines. “We have already seen more people at our showrooms after the election,” said one interviewee.

 

While the housing market faces cost pressures and the CBoC expects starts to fall again in 2019, it’s projecting a sustained rise in construction activity from 2020-23. Interviewees see some opportunities in single-family housing, particularly when it comes to homes aimed at move-up buyers.

 

Industrial properties are definitely a strength as Calgary becomes a growing distribution hub. According to CBRE statistics for the second quarter of 2019, the industrial availability rate was 8.4% in that period, putting that area of the market in a much better position than office properties.

 

With the vacancy rate still quite high at 22.5% in the second quarter of 2019, the downtown office market has seen the withdrawal of some large investors like pension funds, which is creating opportunities for smaller players to acquire buildings and see positive absorption from refreshing them or converting them to other uses. 


Read what clients have to say about Clark on his listing by clicking on the link below! 

Clark Dziadyk is a Trusted Saskatoon Realtor 


Contact Clark today for your Saskatoon Real Estate needs.



Easement and Title Insurance explained By Marla Janzen Trusted Saskatoon Real Estate Expert

As an award-winning  SASKATOON REAL Estate agent Marla Janzen knows the city and surrounding area extremely well. She strives to find her clients the perfect new place to live while negotiating the best terms and price possible. She has a keen eye for house layout and home staging, which really benefits her clients, most of whom are past client referrals! In her latest Saskatoon real estate tip Marla explains title insurance and easementMarla Janzen is a TRUSTED SASKATOON REALTOR® 

Easements and Encroachments on a Property


What is Property Easement?

Property easement is defined as the right to facilitate a fraction of a property for a specified purpose. A survey will help decipher the property boundaries that will prevent any issues from determining land ownership. An easement can allow another person to encroach on your property and even though the lines are declared within the survey, these boundaries may be crossed without the owner’s express permission.  An easement can be included in the title or deed to the property. A prime example of an express easement would be if the power company wanted to run power lines onto a property or a neighbour might even want to enter an agreement to share common parts of the property that extend into both boundaries.  

A prescriptive or implied easement can occur if the use of property continues over an extended period of time.  A good instance of this would be if a neighbour has been crossing a boundary line for years then that neighbour could have obtained a prescriptive easement that will allow him to legally cross the property line.  Also, a “right of way” easement is nothing more than the allowance of someone to cross onto the property in question.  

Many people forget when they are buying a house that they are actually purchasing the land the house is built on and the boundary that surrounds it.  If you were to build a shed in your back yard and it happened to cross the land boundary into the property of another person this could technically be handled in a legal manner. This is something that can be avoided with proper surveys being done and the use of specified easements.

What about Title Insurance?

Title Insurance is a policy issued to the mortgage lender to protect against a defect in title. In Saskatchewan, the Land Titles system guarantees ownership of your land by title. Title Insurance policies provide no information about your property.

Only a Surveyor’s Real Property Report can assure you of the extent of your property and warn of any possible problems. Most of the time people are not going to worry about a few yards here and a few yards there, however, the same people who are okay with the encroachment might not always live there so it always is a good idea to get your bases covered legally and legitimately. This will ensure that down the road you are not going to wind up paying fines and going through a legal process that will cause nothing but problems.

Marla guarantees to provide you with a stress-free, hassle-free, wonderful experience and we are sure once you have met her that you will not contact anyone else!

Marla Janzen is a TRUSTED SASKATOON REALTOR®

Categories

Previous Posts

ADDRESS

S & E Trusted Online Directories Inc
TrustedSaskatoon.com
129 21st St E #500
Saskatoon, SK   S7K 0B2
Ph: 306.244.4150

GET THE APP

App Store Google Play
Follow us on Facebook Linked In Twitter YouTube RSS Feed
Abex
Abex
Stevies
Sabex
NEYA
Website hosting by Insight Hosting