Trusted Tips and Resources

Trusted Tips & Resources

Trusted Saskatoon Roofers and Exterior Experts share their first tip on the snow clearing services they offer

Trusted Saskatoon Roofers  and Saskatoon exterior experts! 


  

 

If you're looking to have your roof saved from ice damming and snow load, then look no further!

We are your choice for roofers, now offers snow clearing services. 

Don't make the mistake of booking just anyone for your rooftop snow maintenance.

There are many things that can go wrong with unexperienced people on your roof:

- Damaged eaves

- Damaged roof vents or roof sheets

- Blocked furnace stacks (can be fatal)

- Damage shingles   

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

J.A.B.A. Construction aTrusted Saskatoon Contractor and Renovations Expert share a tip on the Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit

Planning a renovation in Saskatoon ? J.A.B.A. Construction Ltd. can help! They offer a wide range of General Contracting services for all aspects of both residential and commercial renovations. Their management team will work with you to ensure that you get the services you want, within the timeframe and budget that you determine. J.A.B.A. Construction is professional, reliable and skilled to transform your space into something a little more luxurious, functional or enjoyable.

J.A.B.A are your Trusted SASKATOON CONTRACTORS on the Saskatoon Directory

Here they share a tip on the Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit:

 

  

The Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit can help with the costs of improving safety and accessibility in your home. What's nice is your income doesn’t matter — seniors and their family members at all income levels are eligible!

Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit is a permanent, refundable personal income tax credit for seniors and family members who live with them. If you qualify, you can claim up to $10,000 worth of eligible home improvements on your tax return. The amount of money you get back for these expenses is calculated as 15% of the eligible expenses you claim. For example, if you spend and then claim $10,000 worth of eligible expenses, you could get $1,500 back.

 

 

As always, the BEST advice is to choose a TRUSTED SASKATOON CONTRACTOR / TRUSTED SASKATOON RENOVATIONS expert like JABA construction...you'll be glad you did!

 

 

 

J.A.B.A. Construction a Trusted Saskatoon Contractor and Renovations Expert share a tip on how to keep neighbors happy during a renovation

Planning a renovation in Saskatoon ? J.A.B.A. Construction Ltd. can help! They offer a wide range of General Contracting services for all aspects of both residential and commercial renovations. Their management team will work with you to ensure that you get the services you want, within the timeframe and budget that you determine. J.A.B.A. Construction is professional, reliable and skilled to transform your space into something a little more luxurious, functional or enjoyable.

J.A.B.A are your Trusted SASKATOON CONTRACTORS on the Saskatoon Directory

Here they share tips for keeping your neighbors happy during your home renovation:

  • Inform your neighbors in advance that you will be renovating your home. Offer them information about the contractor you are working with so they feel confident that you have hired a competent, professional contractor. Let them know what kind of insurances your contractor carries in the case any accidents should happen during the construction of the renovation and offer them the contact information of your contractor if they should have any questions you cannot answer about your renovation.   

 

  • Consider your neighbor's schedule and take into consideration if they are working from home, have small children, or work shift work. Tell your neighbors about the hours you've set with your contractor so know what to expect.

 

  • After the first week of construction, it may be nice to touch base with your neighbors to acknowledge that your renovation is an inconvenience to them and bring them some baking or a bottle of wine to let them know you appreciate their cooperation. If the renovation is longer than 3 or 5 weeks, try to continue talking to your neighbors throughout the process. This will give you the opportunity to discuss any grievances your neighbors may have before they become upset over something you weren't even aware occurred. It will also give you a chance to keep them updated on how things are progressing and if you are on track with the project's timeline.  

 

  • Be clear with terms of your contract in regards to site cleanup. Remember the contract is with you and not your neighbors so if any debris should land on your neighbor's property, it is likely that the contractor will not go on to your neighbor's property to clean it up unless signed arrangements have been made to do so. If that is the case, offer to clean up your neighbor's yard from any renovation debris. 

 

  • If you live in an area with street parking, have a conversation with your contractor about where work vehicles or dumpsters will be parked and notify your neighbors.  

 

  • After the renovation is finished, invite them over to show them the finished project as well as toast to them for their patience.  

 

  • If you should have a difficult neighbor that you know you can never please, as long as you know you were considerate and that you made a reasonable effort, you might just have to have a toast to yourself in your newly renovated home.  

 

  • A note to those neighbors that complain at the drop of a hat - You never know when you will on the other side of the fence asking your neighbors to cooperate with you through your own renovation. If you made it diffucult for your neighbors, they'll likely repay the favor. 

 

As always, the BEST advice is to choose a TRUSTED SASKATOON CONTRACTOR / TRUSTED SASKATOON RENOVATIONS expert like JABA construction...you'll be glad you did!

Trusted Saskatoon Kitchen and Renovations expert share a Tip on How to Design a Kitchen - PART 5

If you are dreaming of achieve your Saskatoon Kitchen and Home Renovation & improvement goals! You describe the dream, they bring it to reality! Save money ,time and stress - they will get the job done right! They have a passion and years of expertise to help your renovation dreams come true. Saskatoon Woodworks are your TRUSTED SASKATOON RENOVATION EXPERTS and Saskatoon Kitchen Experts  are waiting to help you with all your home renovation projects.

To check out all the Kitchen design tip blogs click here

Here they share a tip on How to Design a Kitchen - Kitchen Islands:

PART 5:

A kitchen island and its cousin, the peninsula, can vastly expand the design potential and convenience of just about any kitchen. Among the earliest islands were farm tables that gave cooks extra work surfaces and doubled as informal dining stations. Today, a homeowner has the option of islands made of the same materials as the base cabinets and countertop for an integral look. On the other hand, the latest trend is leaning back toward a freestanding look, with upper cabinets, base cabinets, and countertop materials in a mix of materials and colors.

In this scenario, any freestanding piece of furniture with at least one part standing at about counter height can function as an island. Most homeowners prefer a piece that offers hidden cabinets, open shelves, or a combination of the two in addition to another work surface. In a more high-tech kitchen, lower storage may also include a host of refinements such as wine racks and refrigerated drawers.

 

Kitchen islands can come in a variety of shapes and sizes to accommodate any kitchen.
Kitchen islands can come in a variety of shapes
and sizes to accommodate any kitchen.

 

In many kitchens, the island is used as an extra workstation, adding to the usefulness of the work triangle or corridor kitchen. In others, it's used as a low, casual divider defining the perimeter of the kitchen where it meets the family room or breakfast room. In either case, if you add in-floor wiring, plumbing, and gas lines, the possibilities for an island's usefulness are endless. Just about any appliance can be located in an island if the plumbing and electrical wiring are planned in. A wine rack, a gourmet wine chiller, an under-cabinet refrigerator, and an ice-maker on the family room side are very nice options.

On the kitchen side, add a second dishwasher, a microwave, or even an under-cabinet wall oven. In a small or medium-size kitchen, one of the most popular uses of an island is as a place to house the sink. The option of facing toward the family room is so attractive that a kitchen island sink has replaced the classic under-the-window sink in many homes. In a larger kitchen, the island may house a second sink. When combined with easy access to the microwave and the fridge, this setup creates a secondary work triangle.

Your needs and tastes will help determine what kind of island you should have. In a smaller space, you'll get maximum storage, convenience, and a neat appearance if you specify cabinets on both sides of the kitchen island so that dishes can be stashed or removed from either side. For a stylish, freestanding-furniture look that's especially at home in traditional settings, specify an island with table legs and a low shelf for open display and storage. The common kitchen principle of extending every countertop at least an inch beyond the cabinets to prevent dribbling spills down cabinet fronts especially applies to islands. Obviously, you'll need significantly more overhang for knee room (at least 15 inches) if your island is used as a snack table or as a higher snack counter with stools (18 inches).

One of the most dramatic, popular island designs is two-tiered, with food prep on the kitchen side and counter seating on the other. A sink can be stationed either on the same level as the eating counter or on a waist-high work counter with the dining surface on a higher plane. When the appliance you want to house in the island is a cooktop, however, safety dictates that the cooktop be on a lower plane, with the snack counter at least four to six inches higher. Specify heat-resistant material for the countertops adjoining the cooktop and at least 24 inches of counter for landing space on both sides, and provide for at least four inches of heat-resistant backsplash.

An island opposite the fridge is a logical place for the microwave. It's still within the work triangle, which makes sense because most of what goes in the microwave comes from the fridge. Alternatively, if your microwave gets more use by the kids as a snack-fixer, you may prefer to locate it outside the triangle but still near the fridge, in a combination work island/snack bar. Wall ovens are often located outside the work triangle since they're not used as much as a cooktop, and anything you bake or roast will stay in the oven for at least 15 minutes. An island may prove the most convenient landing spot for hot foods out of the oven.

In generously sized kitchens, it might be best to think along the lines of "if one island is good, two are better." A primary island may be stationed within the work triangle, housing extra storage, a mini-fridge or refrigerator drawers, a prep sink, a drop-in cooktop, and so on. Another island might serve solely as a snack bar, perhaps with a small TV perched at one end on a swivel base. If this island defines the perimeter of the kitchen, choose your island base, top, and counter stools to coordinate with the decorative scheme of the adjoining room. Whether this means elegant leather bar chairs, pretty wicker with plump cushions, or metal bistro stools with amusing cut-out motifs is up to you. Even in the kitchen, an island is for fun and adventure!

Kitchen Desks

There's been a real revolution in the definition of "homework" in the past decade, and today's kitchens have risen to the occasion beautifully. Millions of Americans telecommute from conventional jobs or work independently from home on a part-time or full-time basis. Although a dedicated home office is very popular, another option is to locate the office, or a least a workstation, within the kitchen, so that work can be performed in a common area.

Even if the home office is used simply for planning meals and ordering groceries online today, you never know what it might be used for in the future! It would probably be smart to install as sophisticated an electrical system as you can, since your family's needs will likely increase. After all, the kitchen has always been "command central" for the typical family. And, for the many children who have always preferred to do their homework at the kitchen table no matter how well outfitted their rooms, a computer in the kitchen makes it even easier.

A computer desk in the kitchen can take many forms, but don't just set the electronics onto a base cabinet counter and be done with it. If you spend any time at all at this workstation, you'll need an ergonomically sound chair, plenty of knee space, a keyboard tray that drops down to the correct height, and so on. You may want the workstation to face into the kitchen or into the family room so you can keep an eye on your crew; or you may prefer it tucked into a corner, facing the wall, for a greater sense of privacy. As long as you avoid the busy work triangle area, wherever you can fit in your computer station may work.

Power is what the computerized home is about, so make sure you have enough. You'll probably be adding electrical outlets every 36 inches or so along your backsplashes (or on power strips beneath the upper cabinets if switchplates will disturb your backsplash design), so while the electricity is being planned, plan for the desktop computer area. In addition to a computer and a phone, you may need electrical and phone outlets plus counterspace and lower-storage space for a printer, answering machine, fax machine, and any other "must-have" equipment. To conserve space, look for units that provide more than one of these functions. If this is where you'll stash the small TV, make plans for that, too. All this may mean extra new wiring, but most older homes need it to make the leap into the new electronic era.

What if you prefer the scenic byway to the electronic highway? Chances are, you'll still be more comfortable with some kind of a workstation, however informal, in the kitchen. Whether you choose a small writing table, a conventional desk to coordinate with the style of your kitchen, or a desk made of the same material as your kitchen is up to you. In a traditional, formal kitchen, you might enjoy an l8th-century "secretaire" that includes upper glassed cabinets and open shelves as well as lower drawers and a drop-down writing surface. In other cases, you'll want to plan upper storage cabinets with either glass or solid doors.

You'll need enough counterspace to hold a few desk necessities (pens, notepads, scissors, and so on); a few shallow, wide drawers to stash bills and clutter; and space for your recipe box and the cookbooks you use most. If the desk or counter is tucked into a corner near an adjacent wall or run of tall wood cabinets, you can hang a bulletin board and a good-size calendar.

The kitchen is not only a room that you use every single day, it also takes much more abuse that most of the other rooms in your house. As a result, every kitchen needs a little work eventually -- whether it's a simple face-lift or a complete overhaul. Hopefully now you know how to make the kitchen that is right for you.


 

Trusted Saskatoon Renovations expert share a Tip on How to Design a Kitchen - PART 4

 TRUSTED SASKATOON RENOVATION EXPERTS  are waiting to help you with all your home renovation projects.

Here they share a tip on How to Design a Kitchen - Eat-in Kitchens:

PART 4:

The formal, separate dining room has passed in and out of vogue over the decades, but the option of eating in the kitchen has always held appeal. The informal, efficient design of an eat-in kitchen is ideal for today's casual, fast-paced lifestyle. At the same time, today's tastes are distinctly more luxurious than they were a couple of decades ago.

Fortunately, unless you yearn for an authentic period home, there's no reason why you can't have a kitchen dining setup that's both easygoing and opulent. Depending on the size of your kitchen, you have a number of choices for creating an eat-in kitchen. Today's savvy design solutions and coordinated products ensure that any option you choose will fit right in and look great.

  • Counter Dining. Where space is slim or where the users have no special needs, a breakfast bar looks great. A breakfast bar's informality and slim silhouette lends itself naturally to a casual, contemporary scheme, but if your kitchen is opulently traditional, using the same materials for the counter and bar will tie it in perfectly. Imaginative counter stools can be great decorating assets. Make sure the counter overhang is deep enough to accommodate knees comfortably, and, if your stools don't have footrests, make sure your bar has a footrest ledge or rail.

    A two-tiered peninsula or island can house a sink or cooktop on the lower, kitchen side with room for two to four diners opposite. If the peninsula or island houses only a small sink, there's usually plenty of room to seat a number of diners on the same level as the work surface. (A cooktop requires more space and, if possible, the barrier of a different level for safety's sake.) Ideally, allow at least 42 inches from the open end to the opposite wall, and don't locate the fridge or wall oven opposite, where an open door would block traffic. Allow at least 18 inches and preferably 24 inches of elbow room for each diner. And if breakfast never will be your thing, rest assured your cozy nook or chic bar will work just fine for after-school and midnight snacks.

  • Breakfast Nooks. If you have a bit more available space or want a more traditional, cozy look, you might consider adding a breakfast area with built-in banquette seating. A bay window alcove, with a banquette serving as a window seat and with pull-up chairs on the other side of the table, is charming if you can manage it. You can create a welcoming air with plump bench or stool cushions that carry your color scheme.

    No matter how small your kitchen or how rushed your schedule, there is almost always a way to work a little breakfast into the equation. The breakfast nook with fitted bench or banquette seating is a cozy solution that works well in ethnic or country/cottage kitchen design schemes. It's also a cute solution in retro settings inspired by a '50s malt shop booth. The table may be freestanding or may be a peninsula, with one end anchored to the wall or to a run of cabinets. The coziest breakfast nook setup features benches that are parallel, with the table between.

    For a more relaxed, open layout, the benches may be placed perpendicular to one another, with the table spanning the open side. A breakfast nook can be a comfortable solution where space is scant, because benches require much less floor space than chairs. If your family includes a mix of young and not-so-young, a breakfast nook may be a perfect -- and practical -- alternative. Benches are safer than counter stools for young children, and, because the table is a conventional height, it is accessible to wheelchair users.

     

    Eat in kitchens can be the height of comfort and convenience.
    Eat in kitchens can be the height of comfort and convenience.

     

  • Eat-in Kitchens. For large kitchens, or those that feature a natural alcove, dining tables that seat anywhere from four to 12 people are a good option. You can have fun picking out chairs that complement your own personal taste, from heirloom traditional to classic modern glass-and-metal. Another option you may consider is having an island or table made of the same material as your cabinets or countertops. In keeping with the informal nature of kitchen dining, consider small armchairs all around, not just at the head and foot of the table.

    A round table is a friendly choice and is safer for an active family or in a smaller space. In the dining area of your kitchen, away from the stove, you can define a welcoming space with more elaborate curtains or draperies than you would use at a window in the work area. For continuity's sake, match or coordinate your eating-area window treatments with those in the work area. Coordinate window treatments and tabletop textile colors with seating cushions for an inviting, total look.
In our final section, we look at the very useful and convenient kitchen island.

 

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